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Posts Tagged ‘Solomon’


(KJV and NKJV Scripture)

– For there are many unruly and vain talkers and deceivers; especially they of the circumcision.  Whose mouths must be stopped – who subvert whole houses teaching things which they ought not for filthy lucre’s sake. – Titus 1:10-11

– For the love of money is the root of all evil.  Which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows. – 1 Timothy 6:10

Money taints and money talks – and it can rapidly turn any house of God into a den of robbers.  Money corrupts, causing people to behave dishonestly and fraudulently against others and God.  Obtained in such a sordid manner, money is known as lucre, and arouses moral distaste in the mouths of others.

Lucre soils the soul with lust and spoils godly love (1 Peter 1:22).  Following its filth keeps any Christian far from heaven (Mark 7:6), despite feigned words often smooth as butter to the contrary of following Jesus (Psalm 55:21).  Unbelievers can stay far from the Word if they see believers “in it” for worldly gain.

However, people following the path of dishonest profit and lucre is nothing new to God (Ecclesiastes 1:9-10). It can exist as much in the church as outside of it.  In Jeremiah’s days, Judah was so saturated with idolatry and immorality, they could not see they had made God’s house into a den of robbers (Jeremiah 7:11).

We see similar money scenes in the New Testament. Simon the sorcerer thought the gift of the Holy Ghost could be bought with money.  Although he had been baptized with water, Peter told Simon his heart wasn’t right with God (Acts 8:13-21).  The Spirit couldn’t be received, as he was still in iniquity’s bond (Acts 8:23).

Jesus was recorded as being angry just once – when He went into God’s temple and cast out those who bought and sold within (Luke 19:45).  Overthrowing the tables of the money changers, and upsetting the seats of dove sellers (Mark 11:15).  No one must ever have to buy something and pay a price to hear Christ.

These people had turned God’s house of prayer into a house of profit – a deceitful den of greedy thieves (Matthew 21:13).  A pack of grievous wolves Paul warns us about, who speak perverse things to draw disciples after them (Acts 20:29-30).  Altering and distorting God’s gospel for dollars (Galatians 1:6-7).

And, Titus warns us of whole houses being subverted, with preachers teaching things they should not for filthy lucre’s sake (lead verse).  They are greedy dogs who can never have enough; nor understand (Isaiah 56:11).  Scratching itching ears with unsound words; but sure sounding good (2 Timothy 4:3, Titus 2:1).

Getting those in the pews to turn away from truth – and to fables (2 Timothy 4:4).  This is when people get tired about hearing the plain gospel of Christ, the one preaching against worldly gain (Matthew 6:19-20).  Dull of listening to such (Hebrews 5:11), and weary of being unprofitable servants (Luke 17:7-10).

We are to buy the truth placed inside us a Christians, and not sell it.  Nor, are we to market and charge for any godly wisdom, understanding, or instruction we have acquired (Proverbs 23:23).  Paul would work occasionally as a tent maker so he could come to people and preach without gainsaying (Acts 10:29).

Again, goals of earthly gain is not new to God.  There were those back in Old Testament days who couldn’t see any worldly profit by following His ways; including Job.  Job had said “What profit shall I have, if I am cleansed from my sins (Job 35:1-3)?”  Some men in Malachi’s times had similar minds (Malachi 3:14).

God will give us a mouth and wisdom to where our adversaries will be unable to gainsay from – or resist what we speak (Luke 21:15).  However, gainsayers want others to turn from attending to truths of the Word.  Leading greedy souls astray with deceptive words of how to get profit from it (Matthew 24:4).

This has led to ungodly pursuits like the creation of Christian investment programs.  Where participants pool their money and put it into such, so they can all be of one purse when they get a profitable return. Exacting more than God has appointed; and filling their homes with spoil (Luke 3:13, Proverbs 1:13-14).

Greed is an intense and selfish desire for gain.  It has also fueled the explosive growth of merchandising His Word.  It’s turned the church into one giant mall of countless products for Christians to purchase.  This is deceiving masses into believing spiritual growth can occur by spending money on such – over and over.

The damnation of all those who market Christian merchandise for even a penny – does not slumber (2 Peter 2:3).  Those who preach for profit are running greedily after the error of Balaam for reward.  They’re heading for woe – and shall perish in the gainsaying of Core if not repented of (Jude 1:11, Luke 13:3).

All for a love of money and lucre.  All because their god is their belly, and their belief is based on bank account balances.  Bolstered when there is more – bottoming out when there is less.  Minding earthly matters like money and materialism, but whose end is always destruction (Philippians 3:19).

Given everything written so far, keep in mind money by itself is neutral.  If left out of mortal hands, it is harmless.  However, when one has just a little bit of money, it can start wreaking havoc in any home – any life.  Challenging and questioning one’s motives for doing anything, even within a church or ministry.

Even if money is gained honorably from God through humble obedience (e.g. Malachi 3:10, Luke 6:38), it can put people at odds with Him.  Creating more problems than providing any lasting sense of inner peace.  They are never fully satisfied with having riches once dreamed of in the past (Proverbs 27:20).

At one time, Solomon was richer and wiser than any king on earth (1 Kings 10:23).  He had obtained this fortune through unselfish means (2 Chronicles 1:11-12).  Because of this, there was a later time where Solomon withheld no joy from his heart.  He could have whatever he set his eyes on (Ecclesiastes 2:10).

It was not enough.  Solomon foolishly began doing evil in God’s sight.  His father David had fully gone after the Lord – Solomon did not in disobedience (1 Kings 11:6, Acts 13:22, Mark 12:30).  It caused God to stir up an adversary for Israel and Solomon the rest of his days as king (1 Kings 11:14-25).

Wealth can make people many friends.  However, it can make them wonder who their real ones are, and who would disappear when the money does (Proverbs 19:4).  In a similar vein, wealth can cause people to live in constant worry of having worst fears realized. Losing all their riches, regardless of reason or season.

This happened to another man of God in Scripture – Job (Job 3:25).  Worldly prosperity will always drive a wedge between even how the most upright believers (Job 1:8) talk of following God, and how they actually walk.  Spirits must never waver or wander – spiking or dipping based on having favorable finances or not.

Earthly riches are hedges for honoring God.  It is easy to raise hands to heaven and praise His name when one has the money they want.  However, it is a hedge Satan is always ready to cut down.  All he needs is a green light from God as with Job.  Job lost everything short of his life and wife in one day (Job 1:2-3, 9-19)

Jesus warned that our lives do not consist in the abundance of things we possess (Luke 12:15).  We brought nothing into this world – and it is certain we can carry nothing out (1 Timothy 6:7).  What does it profit if we gain the whole world and lose our soul in the end?  One penny can’t save us (Matthew 16:26).

As Christians, we serve the Messiah or Mammon (Luke 16:13).  We cannot do both (1 Corinthians 10:21).  Mammon is wealth considered as an evil influence, or a false object of worship and devotion. Pursuing it debases and demeans God.  It shows Him where faith is really focused (Colossians 3:2).

Those who will be rich in this life fall into temptation and a snare, and into many foolish and hurtful lusts; drowning them in the worldly waters of destruction and perdition (1 Timothy 6:9).  Those who are rich are charged not to be high-minded.  They are not to trust in uncertain riches, but God (1 Timothy 6:17).

Regardless, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than it is for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God (Mark 10:25).  Riches do not profit in the day of our death, but righteousness will deliver us from it (Proverbs 11:4).  The former will cause falling, the latter flourishing (Proverbs 11:28).

Jesus Christ is the only foundation we can lay and build upon as believers.  God warns us to take heed how we build on it (1 Corinthians 3:10-11).  Chasing after greenbacks or greed is building upon a flimsy foundation of Mammon, and another man’s – but not the Son of Man’s (Luke 6:48-49, Romans 15:20).

We are to follow spiritual riches and desire such gifts from our Father.  These are the peaceable fruits He commands us to produce until death (Galatians 5:22-23, Acts 17:30, John 15:16). – meet for repentance (Matthew 3:8).  It is so our faith grows exceedingly, as does our love towards all (2 Thessalonians 1:3).

If we earnestly covet these best gifts, God will show us a more excellent way (1 Corinthians 12:4-31).  If we desire something, then we do all we can to get it. Spiritual gifts cannot come from spending or seeking money, but by spending alone time with God and His Word – away from the steady noise of the world.

We do this through private prayer (Matthew 6:6), studying the Bible to be approved to Him (2 Timothy 2:15), and by being doers of the Word – not just hearers (James 1:22).  This is the godly exercise required to gain contentment in life.  This is how we gain the profit and promise of heaven (1 Timothy 6:6)

Broad is the road to destruction (Matthew 7:13).  God warns us not to err from our walk on the straight and narrow (James 1:16, Matthew 7:14).  Satan is always waiting to lead us away to a faith shipwreck (2 Peter 3:17, 1 Timothy 1:19).  Instead of the Almighty – following the almighty dollar is a sure-fire way to err.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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KJV and NKJV Scripture

– Here is the patience of the saints: Here are they that keep the commandments of God, and the faith of Jesus. – Revelation 14:12

– Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God. – Philippians 4:6

Impatience in life is marked by ungodly attributes such as anxiety or complaining.  Impatience with God is marked by the same things.  It’s a feeling one gets when something is just not happening as quickly as expected.  It’s a restless wanting or ache to do or get something – and something/someone is preventing it.

Impatient people have trouble waiting for anything, and pride is a common cause.  Often wanting others to serve them in a timely fashion, in accordance with anticipations based on their inordinate opinion of themselves, even if only in their mind.  Otherwise, contentions are bound to begin (Proverbs 13:10).

Long check-out lines at the store, or short traffic light times annoy them.  Almost everything in their life takes on an air of urgency or emergency, even if just imagined in their head – as is usually the case.  They easily get aggravated when delays and interruptions, whatever the cause, interrupt their schedule.

An impatient Christian sins because it’s a lack of faith (Hebrews 11:1).  It shows reluctance to wait on His promises not yet seen to come true.  They don’t like waiting too long for worldly things, much less those of the Word.  Hold-ups irritate, creating impatient traits such as cursing or murmuring (Philippians 2:14).

Impatient people also have a tendency to exaggerate the importance of their daily activities.  Whatever they’re involved with matters much more than what anyone else is – even among family, friends, or co-workers.  If anything or anyone interferes with their efforts to have a productive day, they get annoyed.

However, the words important and productive do not appear in Scripture.  As Solomon wisely pointed out many times, our life is vanity and vexation of spirit (Ecclesiastes 1:14, 2:11,17,26, 4:4,16, 6:9) without salvation.  Vanity means useless, a waste of time – not producing end results one desired at the outset.

We all arrived upon earth as creatures subject to vanity (Romans 8:20).  When we die, all claims of belief in God will have been in vain, if we did not endure all He commanded (Matthew 24:13, Hebrews 12:20).  We failed to hold fast in patient faith; and forgot what was preached to us (1 Corinthians 15:2).

Salvation is our expected end in this life (Jeremiah 29:11).  It is a hope we are to wait with patience for – for any hope seen is no longer hope (Romans 8:24-25).  This patience is one of the many spiritual fruits God commands us to produce continually until our death (Galatians 5:22-23, Acts 17:30, John 15:16)

Fruits to be brought forth meet with our repentance to salvation (Matthew 3:8) – to keep us climbing up heaven’s staircase the correct way (2 Peter 1:5-8). Impatient rushing in this world can cause us to skip or forget steps, and make us slip a little or take a tumble (Hebrews 2:1).  Spiritual impatience can do the same.

It’s why we must be diligent and make our calling and election by God sure.  If we do, then He promises us we will never fall.  We will take each step with Him in steadfast patience (2 Peter 1:10) – so an entrance will be administered abundantly unto us at the end into heaven’s everlasting kingdom (2 Peter 1:11).

Otherwise, Jesus will call us a robber and thief for climbing up the wrong way (John 10:1).  Spiritual stealing works the same way as the physical kind. People who don’t want to wait and do things legally to acquire an item desired, will rob.  Physical theft leads to prison; spiritual theft to death without deliverance.

Why is having patience so crucial prior to and for salvation?  One reason is because our Father is a God of patience and consolation.  Without patience we can’t learn to be like-minded, one toward another in Jesus – nor receive each other with any forbearance and tolerance; as God is to us (Romans 15:5-7).

Another reason is patience purifies our hearts by faith (Acts 15:9).  If we’re impatient in the world one day, and patient the next, we are still wavering in our walk with God (Ephesians 4:14).  This is having a double mind (James 1:6-8).  It is trying to eat and drink at two tables simultaneously (1 Corinthians 10:21).

In the same vein, patience purifies our motives.  It shows God if our prayers are amiss, asking for things just to consume on our lusts (James 4:3).  Or, do we trust Him to know our needs before we do (Matthew 6:8)?  We are to be content with what we already have – and not want (Hebrews 13:5, Psalm 23:1).

If we ever want anything from God, then we have impatience within us to deal with and correct.  Why? Because our Father is going to try our faith to work patience in us, and we are to let this patience have her perfect work.  So we may be perfect and entire, wanting nothing from God ever again (James 1:3-4).

A third reason is we’re all running a spiritual race of faith.  If we were running something like a marathon, we wouldn’t sprint out of the starting gate and run as hard and fast as we could right off the bat, or we’d be exhausted in the first few miles.  Instead, we would set a steady, straightforward pace from start to finish.

Even then, we might not win.  There could be other contestants better conditioned, and who trained with much more discipline and commitment than we did. Spiritual training is very similar.  If we are doing it in accordance with the Word, we are to lay aside the weight of all sin that so easily besets us in the world.

This is so we can run with patience the race of faith set before us.  Even though we have a heavenly cloud of witnesses along the route rooting us on, we are to be looking ahead at all times towards the finish line. Only Christ is waiting there to hand us our eternal crown of victory if we endure (Hebrews 12:1-2).

Patience commands moderation and self-restraint.  It means we learn temperance.  This is another fruit to be produced (Galatians 5:23), and another step on heaven’s staircase (2 Peter 1:6).  Spiritual growth should show more abstinence from worldly things and ways each year, and more abidance to the Word.

It all plays an integral part in patiently running our spiritual race as the apostle Paul wrote about as follows:  “Do you not know that those who run in a race all run, but one receives the prize?  Run in such a way that you may obtain it.  And everyone who competes for the prize is temperate in all things.

Now they do it to obtain a corruptible crown, but we for an incorruptible one.  I therefore so run – not with uncertainty.  So I fight – not as one who beats the air (1 Corinthians 9:24-25).”  Running around to and fro aimlessly without a steady direction, purpose, or focus (Colossians 3:2) – is vainly beating the air.   

Sadly, it seems we are living in a world teaching less patience each year.  We have so many on-demand devices and programs available, we can get used to having things now – not later.  This is coupled with an incentive-laced system of earning gifts or monetary rewards for many purchases we make (Isaiah 1:23).

However, impatience is never a new thing to God (Ecclesiastes 1:9-10).  We see examples throughout Scripture, starting off with Abraham and Sarah not wanting at first to wait for Isaac to be born in God’s timing.  Instead, they rushed the matter with Hagar, who birthed the wild child Ishmael (Genesis 16:1-15).

Also in the Old Testament, Esau’s impatience cost him his birthright (Genesis 25:24-34).  We see impatience in the New Testament with the Prodigal Son, who did not want to wait until later to receive his inheritance. So he got it, wasted it, and began to be in want as the swine dined better than he was (Luke 15:11-16).

Impatient behavior leads to hasty words – towards each other or heaven.  It is hard to let words be few, when stewing about in impatience (Ecclesiastes 5:2). Hearts can only hold so much before something spills out of a mouth (Luke 6:45).  Blessing and cursing from the same ought not to be so (James 3:9-10).

We must never be ignorant about any of this, as impatience is a powerful tool the devil uses to pull us away from the truth.  To keep us bustling about in bursts and flurries of impatient activity in the world he’s the prince of (John 14:30).  Reaping nothing more than the whirlwind being sown (Hosea 8:7).

The devil roars around like a starving lion.  Trying to devour us in impatience – to gain advantage with deceptive devices we can’t be unaware of (1 Peter 5:7-8, 2 Corinthians 2:11).  We should not marvel. Satan and his angels are transformed into ministers of light and righteousness (2 Corinthians 11:14-15).

Deceiving the whole world is the only job God gave Satan upon casting him out from heaven (Revelation 12:9, Luke 10:18).  We are warned by our Father to let no man or the devil ever deceive us (Mark 13:5). Heavenly wrath comes down upon His children who succumb to such disobedience (Ephesians 5:6).

Deception thrives on impatient people.  It is often those who are greedy for gain (Proverbs 15:27) or fame.  They want such with no desire to count the cost beforehand (Luke 14:28) and put the time in. Instead, they dream of instant riches or success; and think becoming a Christian meant instant salvation.

Scam artists and con men use deception to prey upon such desires.  They dupe people into believing there’s great gain down the road, by getting them to buy into likeable lies along the way – until it is too late to do much about it.  It is how Bernie Madoff “made off” with so much.  It is how Satan makes off with souls.

Jesus said “By your patience possess your souls (Luke 21:19).”  If we have no rule over our spirit, we’re like a city of old broken down by invading forces – and no longer with walls (Proverbs 25:28).  Uninvited and ungodly guests like impatience walk in unhindered and take up residence in our hearts and minds.

Their landlord is Satan, who is always ready to lead us away in err to faith shipwrecks.  If so, it’s because we failed to grow in patient grace (2 Peter 3:17-18, 1 Timothy 1:19).  We had no time to hear people out in any matter, or give them benefit of the doubt.  We were too busy rushing about in unsaintly impatience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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KJV and NKJV Scripture:

– Charge them that are rich in this world, that they not be high-minded, nor trust in uncertain riches … but in the living God, who richly gives us all things to enjoy. – 1 Timothy 6:17

Nowhere in Scripture does God say we can’t be rich in regards to money.  It is a matter of how our hearts and minds view it, use it, and comprehend where it always comes from (Deuteronomy 8:17-18) – that matters to Him.  Abraham, Job, and Solomon would have been considered wealthy by today’s standards. However, they also learned sometimes painful and persistent lessons about the dangers of earthly gain.

God once told Abraham not to regard his stuff – for the good of the land was already his (Genesis 45:20). Job lost nearly everything he had in one day, because his abundance had become his hedge for honoring God (Job 1:10-19).  All of Solomon’s wealth was not enough to satisfy him (Ecclesiastes 2:4-11).  He failed to fully follow after God like his father David had – and suffered the consequences (1 Kings 11:4-25).

Whether we are worldly rich or worldly poor, we are to be content with our wages.  We are not to spend our time trying to exact more than what God has already appointed (Luke 3:13-14).  We are to be content with food and clothing (1 Timothy 6:8).  If we follow the right things, God promises to thoroughly furnish us for all good works, including financially (Philippians 4:19, 1 Timothy 6:11, 2 Timothy 3:17).  

If we are not happy or satisfied with our finances at any time, we will be following after more at least part of the time.  We will spend at least a portion of our brief existence on this earth trying to bolster our bank accounts, improve our portfolios, and/or set money aside for future times such as our retirement. Days in the future we may never see (Proverbs 27:1, James 4:14).  It’s all vanity (Ecclesiastes 5:10).

If we do so, we are still saying we want something from God (Psalm 23:1).  We are not casting all our cares on Him (1 Peter 5:7).  We are not fully trusting He knows all our needs before we do (Matthew 6:8). Any devotion to gathering wealth, any concentration on keeping cash flows constant, or any focus on earthly gain is incompatible with our devotion to God. We cannot serve two masters (Luke 16:13).

Wealth in this world can make us many friends – but our friends cannot save us (Proverbs 19:4).  All of the riches we may have cannot be used as a ransom for someone else’s life.  All of their riches cannot be used as a ransom for ours.  Our souls are precious to God – and they were bought back with the blood of Christ at Calvary – not by how much money we may have in the bank (Psalm 49:6-8, 1 Corinthians 6:20).

Regardless of what we may have – God requires us to be good stewards of it.  However, in His economy, this means we share our blessings with others.  Not preferring them for our own present and personal enjoyment – or stockpiling them for later use by ourselves (e.g. Proverbs 3:27-28, Isaiah 58:7, Luke 3:11, Luke 6:38, Hebrews 13:16, James 4:3, James 5:1-3).  This earth’s profit is for all (Ecclesiastes 5:9).

We can’t receive anything in life except from heaven (John 3:27).  Freely we have been given – freely we are to give (Matthew 10:8),  We are to always offer willingly for this reason (1 Chronicles 29:14).  With cheer; not out of necessity – as if we are only giving to get something back from God (2 Corinthians 9:7). Not so some become overly abundant or burdened, but so there is equality (2 Corinthians 8:12-14).

Even though so many try to figure out precisely what they will need in the way of future finances, worldly riches are always uncertain (lead verse).  The only thing we all can be certain about in this world – is we brought nothing in – and we can carry nothing out of it (1 Timothy 6:7).  With this in mind – what does it profit us if we gain the whole world and lose our souls in the end (Matthew 16:26, Luke 12:16-21)?

 

 

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(Scripture from the NKJV and KJV)

– And when the queen of Sheba heard of the fame of Solomon – concerning the name of the Lord – she came to prove him with hard questions. – 1 Kings 10:1

– There are answers we’re not wise enough to see. – “The Riddle” by Five for Fighting, written by John Ondrasik, copyright 2006

Life is full of hard questions.  Still, the answers we may seek – the truthful responses – may be much harder to accept than the questions themselves.  Where we go in our quest for these answers – says a lot about our level of faith.  Do we turn to fellow believers first (i.e. church pastors, elders, etc.) – perhaps hoping they’ll give us softer answers and advice requiring the least repentance?  Or, do we turn to God first  – for many hard answers we can’t bear while on earth (John 16:12)?

Only God knows our hearts – He fashioned them while making us (Psalm 139:15).  Ministries can get blamed in time (2 Corinthians 6:3) if members attempt delving into heart matters of any other person.  What happens when a troubled person gets different responses from different believers – for the same hard question?  If we’re fools by trusting our hearts (Proverbs 28:26) – what would make any of us think we can answer the hard questions of other’s hearts?  Well, Solomon and Job did.

Solomon exceeded all the kings of earth for riches and wisdom (1 Kings 10:23).  When the queen of Sheba heard about this – she went to find out for herself (lead verse).  Loading up a very great train of gifts, she set out for Jerusalem – some 1,500 miles away.  After arriving, the queen communed with Solomon of all that was in her heart – nothing was hid (1 Kings 10:2-3). When her hard questions had been answered – his wisdom was more than she had believed from afar (1 Kings 10:6-7).

Job got caught up in his counsel to others – he said so himself (Job 29:21).  Men gave ear to his words and kept silent after – waiting to hear from Job again like waiting for rain.  They drank in his further counsel like a very thirsty person might with long-awaited water from the sky (Job 29:22-23).  Job chose out their ways – dwelling as chief among them (Job 29:25).  People followed Job more than God – and Job’s glory was fresh in him because of it (Job 29:20, 1 Corinthians 1:12-13).

Solomon soon developed a wife problem (1 Kings 11:3) – Job already had an “I” problem (Job 29:14-19).  Solomon’s heart was turned away from God – Job’s heart was turned towards himself.  They could answer hard questions from others about God and life – but they had a hard time maintaining a right faith “focus”.  Consequently, both men lost nearly everything they had – as a result of forgetting, not fearing, and not fully following God (1 Kings 11:6-13, Job 1:9:19).

God has hard questions for all of us – about Himself and His nature.  They are all unanswerable.  Our Father presented them to Job out of the whirlwind – and they humbled Job (Job 38:1 – Job 41:11).  He then hated himself for uttering things he did not understand – then repented in dust and ashes (Job 42:2-6).  If we are not humbled by those very same questions – are we not still haughty, high-minded, and prideful in thinking we can answer the hard “heart” questions of others?

Pride goes before destruction – and a haughty spirit before a fall (Proverbs 16:18).  Nearly everything Job had was destroyed by God – and Solomon fell out of favor with Him – in part for trying to answer hard questions they had no business trying to answer. Job’s fortunes were restored for humbling himself – twice as much as before (Job 42:10).  Solomon did not – and the Lord stirred up adversaries against the king until his death (1 Kings 11:14-25).  Both men had to learn hard lessons.  Will we?

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