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Posts Tagged ‘Proverbs’


KJV and NKJV Scripture

– Knowing this, that the trying of your faith works patience.  But let patience have her perfect work, that you may be perfect and entire – wanting nothing. – James 1:3-4

– Not that I speak in respect of want – for I have learned in whatsoever state I am in – therewith to be content. – Philippians 4:11

– The devil does not come to you with his red face and horns.  He comes to you disguised as everything you’ve ever wanted. – Anonymous

The disembodied hand writing on the plaster wall was spelling out and sealing Belshazzar’s final fate, to be brought upon him by God later that same night (Daniel 5:5).  This, on an evening starting out as a celebration of the king’s power, posterity, and possessions (Daniel 5:1-4).  However, the mood of the party-goers changed – as did Belshazzar’s demeanor when the words “Mene, Mene, Tekel, Upharsin” (Daniel 5:25) appeared before them.  The king’s knees shook in fear and he soiled himself upon seeing it (Daniel 5:6).  Before he knew what the message meant, his guilty conscience before God got the best of him.

He understood immediately the words were from above – and it was not going to be good news.  When David was brought in to interpret, Belshazzar’s worst fears were realized (Job 3:25).  He’d been weighed in God’s balances and found to be wanting, and his kingdom was to be split among the Medes and Persians (Daniel 5:24-28). What was Belshazzar wanting?  Salvation – and it was too late.  No more space would be given to repent (Revelation 2:21).  The king’s neck had stiffened against God so much for being absorbed in idolatry, want, and pride – he was cut off from heaven forever (Proverbs 29:1, Daniel 5:23, Daniel 5:30).

When our Father in heaven says not to do something, He means not to do it.  God does not give out casual recommendations, or friendly suggestions and advice on how we are supposed to live in steadfast (Hebrews 3:14) alignment and agreement with His will and way.  Instead, He gives us commandments to humbly obey and abide by every second until we die (Philippians 2:8).  They are not heavenly options to ponder over and pass on.  Therefore, when God tells us we are not to want – then we are not to (Psalm 23:1).  Living in want keeps us from being presented as peaceful, unblameable souls at the end (2 Peter 3:14).

Why?  Want is worldly.  It is walking in the spirit of err – not in the way of truth (Proverbs 19:27, James 1:16, 1 John 4:6).  Not only does want keep faith and belief incorrectly focused on things below (Colossians 3:2), but it leaves a heart wide open for seeds of sins like lust, covetousness, envy, and greed to take root and grow.  Then, they slowly spread worldly weeds throughout the soul as it all gradually chokes out the Word, and production of spiritual fruits commanded by God to be continually be brought forth in keeping with repentance unto salvation (Mark 4:19, Galatians 5:22-23, Matthew 3:8, John 15:16, 2 Corinthians 7:10).

Any true Christian (John 3:5) in a state of want is spiritually unstable in all their ways (James 1:6-8, James 4:8).  Faith, trust, and belief in – and love of God and Christ waver and drift (Ephesians 4:14, Hebrews 13:9), often spiking and dipping drastically based on whether a want is being fulfilled/obtained or not.  A person in this condition cannot be content with anything they have in life now – because they’re concentrating on future wants (Hebrews 13:5, Luke 3:14).  Dissatisfaction in this sense breeds impatience with a God they want to do their will as soon as possible, making it impossible to receive heaven’s promise (Hebrews 10:35-36).

The definition of want is a lack or deficiency of something – or someone.  Sadly, some will spend their whole life pursuing want after want.  Looking for certain people, following dreams, and making purchase after purchase to acquire desired material possessions.  All to find a feeling of fulfillment and purpose – hoping a life of repetitively obtaining wants will be what it takes to create a lasting sense of happiness.  Although they may be aware of a nagging, inner emptiness and loneliness throughout – they keep relying on and turning to external means and methods to make the ache go away – trying to fill and fix the bothersome void.

They don’t work.  As Billy Graham said, “They make for great fire escapes, but terrible fire extinguishers.”  No one but Christ can quench wants.  Godly joy and fulfillment can only be regenerated daily by Jesus residing in the soul by faith through the power of the Holy Ghost (Ephesians 3:16-17, Titus 3:5).  This is why one must be born again of the Spirit (John 3:5) for all wants to begin subsiding through repentance and remission of such sin.  This is when God begins rooting out and burning up weeds of want (Matthew 15:13, John 15:1-6), to produce a spiritually fruitful soul (Galatians 5:22-23), from branches of inner happiness.

Through His truth, God has to transform an always “wishing and wanting” soul conformed to this world (Romans 12:1-2) into a perfectly content being – no matter what state they are in at all times (second lead verse) – even if they have no more than food and clothes (1 Timothy 6:8).  Worldly Christians would not want a life with so little, for they would see it as God messing with them.  They desire earthly blessings; not eternal.  Unholy pastors prey upon this “more is better” approach to achieving a happy life with Christ (1 Corinthians 15:19).  Gearing and steering sermons into alignment with the world – not the Word.

Don’t misunderstand – for there can be seemingly noble and honorable wants such as sound health, happy homes, or strong inter-personal relationships.  However, these desires can become a means to an end.  In other words, God may only receive praise when these wants are first achieved – then maintained.  If health starts failing, homes become filled with strife, and relationships falter, then problems with God can begin.  Along with the words “This is NOT what I want (need) right now.”  However, He requires all things past (Ecclesiastes 3:15), and we must get past all want to be in agreement with Him (Amos 3:3).

In conclusion, when anyone gets deceived by the devil, they begin believing they know themselves better than anybody else – including the One who fashioned their heart in the womb to be desperately wicked (Jeremiah 17:9).  In turn, they foolishly start trusting their heart and self (Proverbs 28:26, 2 Corinthians 1:9) to know exactly what they need and want at all times.  Being certain that whatever they get will “work out” – and it does not.  Or, maybe it does for varying periods of time, until the devil tempts and entices them once again they have got to buy or try some new thing they see on TV or hear about from others (Acts 17:21).

It’s an endless cycle for some as Satan constantly spins his”want wheel” before their eyes.  It’s how Christians can end up feeling like they are being spiritually yanked about (Matthew 11:30) by a dizzying array of daily product options to consider, and periodic life-change choices to make or forsake.  Their attempts to partake at God’s and the devil’s table simultaneously – beget jealousy in Him (1 Corinthians 10:21).  It says His grace isn’t sufficient (2 Corinthians 12:9) as they are still in want of something or someone.  Life with Christ isn’t satisfying.  It’s why hell will never be full – and full is how Satan wants it (Proverbs 27:20).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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KJV and NKJV Scripture

– Neither filthiness, neither foolish talking, neither jesting – which are not convenient; but rather giving of thanks. – Ephesians 5:4

– Jest not with the two-edged sword of God’s Word. – Thomas Fuller

Our word “jester” is derived from the Anglo-Latin “gestour” – meaning “minstrel.”  In medieval times, kings and noblemen often needed a person who could minister to the spirits of their people through the use of humor.  So, most of them had a court jester ready at their disposal to do such a thing.  These comedians were generally seen as buffoons simply brought in to brighten the moods of those in attendance, who might be brooding, frustrated, or feeling down about life.

The jester would be decked out in brightly colored clothes – to further help lighten the atmosphere of the setting.  Setting about entertaining and amusing the crowd, often cracking jokes about current events and making sarcastic wisecracks about people well-known to the audience – outside the kingdom walls, of course.  Once the show was over … so was the job of the jester.  They weren’t taken seriously by anyone who might meet they walking the streets afterwards.

In the modern world, jesters are typically known as comics.  They are found almost anywhere around the world, and people typically pay money to see them perform.  All to hear what appear to be witty remarks, bantering comments, and good-natured ribbing.  Just like the jesters of yore, they crack jokes about worldly situations or events of the day, and make wisecracks about well-known individuals like politicians, athletes, and movie-stars familiar to most in the audience.

However, there is a fine line between humor and hurt. Words are a powerful tool God has given us.  They can heal or harm.  We will be justified or condemned for eternity by the words we speak on earth (Matthew 12:37).  Some people – including Christians, make it a very nasty habit of spewing forth spirit-bruising wisecracks about those deemed less fortunate, or who’ve made a mess of life.  If famous, they become society’s laughing-stock to mock and make fun of.

There isn’t any humor in hell, or anything funny about burning there forever.  Salvation is serious business with God, or else He would not have crucified His only Son for us.  It is not to be a laughing matter – ever. Foolish talking has no part in Christian fellowship, nor does it belong in witnessing to lost and unbelieving souls.  Jesting or joking of any kind has no place n a relationship with Jesus.  Sadly, it does, and it always gives place to the devil’s devices (Ephesians 4:27).

Having said all this, loving God with all of our heart, mind, soul, and strength (Luke 10:27) – is not about having a good time in life (1 Corinthians 15:19).  It is not about yukking it up, playing practical jokes and/or pulling pranks, or trying to yank somebody’s chain in a world where Satan retains power over all deaths until Jesus returns (Hebrews 2:14).  Christ is the only example we need to know there is nothing funny in going about our Father’s business daily (Luke 2:49).

Jesus did not go around cracking jokes or poking fun at people like the Pharisees and Sadducees – or even the twelve disciples.  Then saying things such as “Just kidding” – or “I didn’t mean it” to someone like Simon Peter if he looked a bit peeved or put off at something Christ perceived to be funny.  Or, telling another like Andrew he needed to lighten up, go let his hair down and have some fun – for he was being far too serious and over-cautious (1 Peter 5:8, Ephesians 5:14-15).

Christianity can’t be the fodder for comedic sketches and routines … no matter how innocent or harmless they might seem.  The only ones finding any humor in heavenly issues are those making light of salvation (Matthew 22:5).  They have no fear of God before their eyes (Romans 3:18).  Why would they have a reason to be terrified, when they’ve managed to take hell’s keys away from Him; letting themselves into heaven while on earth (Luke 12:5, Revelation 1:18)?

Consequently, they have turned their steadfast focus back to having fun and rollicking good times on earth (Colossians 3:2) – even in church (Ecclesiastes 7:4). Minding earthly matters (Philippians 3:19) , staying entangled in life’s affairs (2 Timothy 2:4), pursuing its pleasures (James 5:5), and attending to far more vital worldly business and merchandise (Matthew 22:5). After all, heaven is in the bag, along with the latest comic CD by some Christian funny man or woman.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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KJV and NKJV Scripture

– And many false prophets shall arise, and shall deceive many. – Matthew 24:11

– He who is false to his God will not be true to his fellow mortals. – Matthew Henry

Our word “false” comes to us from the Latin “falsus.” It means deceptive, feigned, or pretend.  Our word “prophet” is defined as a person who is regarded to be an inspired teacher or proclaimer of God’s will.  Put them together to get “false prophet.”  It is any person who asserts they know (and are doing) His will – but it is all a pretense intended to defraud souls under the guise of following Christ and the truth of God’s Word.

These imposters have privately brought damnable heresies into the church since the time of Christ (2 Peter 2:1).  They’ve crept into sanctuaries unaware; turning God’s grace into a license for lasciviousness (Jude 1:4), or a green light from heaven to pursue worldly lusts under the banner of faith.  Mocking the Cross by making money off of God’s Word, they are the ungodly souls whose destruction will be swift.

We usually see these swindlers on TV, putting forth their false dreams and lying divinations (Ezekiel 13:6-7) to people in the pews and general viewing public. Saying things like, “The Lord placed this on my heart last night, and it’s imperative I tell you now.  Just sow your seed of faith with this ministry – a minimum of $100 please – and God will double your blessing in 24 hours.  Double your donation and He will triple it.”

Speaking words smoother than butter and soften than oil, their hearts are but drawn swords (Psalm 55:21). They could care less if we are blessed by God or not. As long as they keep people opening their wallets and purses to keep their own cash drawers full and bank accounts brimming, they don’t believe or see they are foolishly sinning.  Fashioning themselves to former lusts in willful ignorance of the truth (1 Peter 1:14).

Ir’s right in their eyes (Proverbs 14:12) so it must be the same in God’s (Deuteronomy 13:18).  They say it’s being done for His glory, but it’s just so they can generate worldly profit and pursue worldly pleasures (James 5:5).  Laying up treasures below (Matthew 6:19) they cannot take with them when they go (1 Timothy 6:7).  Preying upon the needy (Matthew 6:8), greedy, and those of easy belief and/or deceit.

Billy Graham once said that prisons are full of con men, and sadly, so are many churches (end).”  If these Christian charlatans and scam artists had any good conscience towards God as commanded, they would stop cheating on Him (1 Timothy 1:5).  They would cease subverting whole houses for filthy lucre’s sake.  They would stop their mouths from teaching vain, unruly things they ought not to (Titus 1:10-11).

If these con artists prophesying false dreams had stood in God’s counsel to begin with, they would be turning from their evil ways (Jeremiah 23:22,32). They’d stop swerving everyone from the truth (1 Timothy 1:6), using their perverted versions of His Word and like visions.  Making things up (Numbers 16:28) and moving everyone far from the gospel they first knew as kids (Galatians 1:6-7, 2 Timothy 3:15).

These are the grievous wolves Jesus and Paul said would enter in and deceive many, because they will be disguised in sheep’s clothing, speaking perverse things to draw disciples away after themselves.  They will be ravenous for earthly riches and will not spare God’s flock in the process (Matthew 7:15, Acts 20:29-30).  Draining bank accounts of others to bolster their own, and to keep their bellies full (Philippians 3:19).

Some travel in packs, seeking God’s true sheep to fleece – picking pockets clean.  All so these deceivers can be of one purse and fill their homes with spoil (Proverbs 1:13-15).  Yet, they live on in err (James 1:16), having forsaken the right way to heaven in favor of Balaam’s way and the gainsaying of Core (2 Peter 2:15,18, Jude 1:11).  Spiritual whores chasing worldly riches or rewards on every floor (Hosea 9:1).

God warns us to take heed, testing and trying the spirits, for many of these false prophets have gone out into the world (1 John 4:1).  One test is this:  If any Christian preacher, teacher, singer, writer, or movie maker, makes merchandise of you – even if they charge a cent for a thing they sell (2 Corinthians 12:9)- they are false prophets.  Their damnation in hell from long ago does not slumber (2 Peter 2:3).

 

 

 

 

 

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KJV and NKJV Scripture

– Do all things without murmurings and disputings, – Philippians 2:14

– Use hospitality to one another without grudging. – 1 Peter 4:9

Complaining is a joy and time stealer.  It can make a soul feel weary and worn-out if it persists day in and day out (Job 10:1). it is also a sin very displeasing to our Father as all transgressions against His truth do, It keeps one on destruction’s broad road (Numbers 11:1, Matthew 7:13) and off the straight and narrow avenue to heaven’s gate (Matthew 7:14). Why?

It gives a place for the devil (Ephesians 4:27), to use his devices designed to first gain an advantage over (2 Corinthians 2:11), then slowly devour and destroy souls given to grudging and griping.  One cannot grow in grace this way.  It is how Satan leads people away in the err of the wicked (2 Peter 3:17-18), sometimes all the way to shipwrecked faiths (1 Timothy 1:19).

Grousing and grumbling breed ungodly impatience (Hebrews 10:36, Revelation 14:12), irritation, and annoyance over the littlest interruptions, unexpected delays, having to wait anywhere, and other perceived nuisances keeping life from being “just right” for long. Something’s always wrong,  It is too hot, too cold, too fast, too slow – making everything constantly so-so.

Habitual complainers play the blame game throughout their life.  It is an existence of passing the buck that started in the Garden of Eden – and hasn’t topped for some since (Genesis 3:9-13).  If you should mention any difficulty or problem they’re facing, the fault is never with them.  It is easier to point the finger of blame outwards or upwards than back at themselves.

One reason why hell and destruction will never be full is because complainers are never truly satisfied with anything or anyone (Proverbs 27:20).  They cannot be content in whatever state they are in for too long (Philippians 4:11) as their eyes are always scanning the nearest horizon.  Ever searching for something to grouse about, or someone to do the same thing with.

Why would God allow souls to gain heaven, if all they did was complained on earth?  They’d be so unhappy forever.  Halos would always be a bit too loose or too tight, angelic robes would never fit quite right, and off-key harps would cause day and night harping.  All the while, they would be whining about why they had to be God’s servant for an eternity (Revelation 22:3).

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KJV and NKJV Scripture

– A lord on whose hand the king leaned, answered the man of God and said, “Behold, if the Lord would make windows in heaven, might this thing be?”  And, Elisha said, “Behold, you will see it with your own eyes – but you shall not eat thereof.” – 2 Kings 7:2

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could have windows in heaven to see what goes on behind the Pearly Gates on a regular basis?  A lord back in the Old Testament wanted such a thing – because he would not take God at His word.  Even though He had already promised to end a long Samarian famine in exactly 24 hours and provided exact details about the provisions, He didn’t say how it would come to pass (2 Kings 7:1,3-16).

Despite God’s assurance, all this lord could see were dry skies and hear nothing but the rumbling of empty, hungry stomachs.  He could not perceive anything but more starvation.  So, he wanted some proof – not a promise.  Well, God delivered as declared.  Everyone had food to eat and share.  Except this man – whose doubt shut him out from the bounty.  God killed him for his lack of faith (2 King 7:17-20, Hebrews 11:1).

There’s an old saying of “Be careful what you wish for.”  What we may want to have or see, can be quite different when actually before us.  It can be a far cry from what we might have perfectly imagined in our minds beforehand.  Many may wonder what a God who does not sleep (Psalm 121:4) keeps busy with sitting upon this earth’s circle (Isaiah 40:22).  What would we really see if we could peek into heaven?

Would we see how God goes about performing a much-needed miracle in someone’s life?  Perhaps. Would we view how He arranges for an unexpected blessing to be bestowed on a desperate soul?  Maybe. Would we witness how He orchestrates the death of someone?  Well, this is exactly what we read about in 1 Kings as God asks all the host of heaven who will execute His evil upon King Ahab (1 Kings 22:19-21).

Why?  Ahab had hardened his heart against heaven (Hebrews 3:15).  Following after idols and working much wickedness in the Lord’s sight (1 Kings 21:25-26).  Repeatedly disobeying God – until God cut Ahab off without remedy (Proverbs 29:1).  Sending down an angel to make Ahab’s prophets lie to him (1 Kings 22:22-23) – so he would go to Ramoth-Gilead as he wanted all along, and die there (1 Kings 22:29-37).

Heaven doesn’t have windows for good reason.  We could see God creating evil (Isaiah 45:7) – and not pleasing things.  We would not have any need for the spiritual work of believing a God we can’t see (John 1:18, John 6:29) – if we could see all He was doing   Nor would we have to live by faith (Romans 1:17). We could just turn our faces to the sky and witness how and why some things happen – and some don’t.

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BITTERNESS


KJV and NKJV Scripture

– Looking diligently, lest any fall of the grace of God. Lest any root of bitterness springing up trouble you, and thereby many be defiled. – Hebrews 12:15

– Let all bitterness, and wrath, and anger, and clamour, and evil speaking be put away from you – with all malice. – Ephesians 4:31

Bitterness towards life, or the Lord, arises out of false perceptions it brings that things aren’t quite working out how a person hoped they would at some prior point.  Notions of rewarding jobs, joyous marriages, riches, etc. – never materialized – and fault always lies with others (including God).  So, the bitter soul stews and simmers on, with unhealthy views of life.

However, instead of doing anything about it, often born out of a “why bother” mind, because nothing has really worked out before, the bitter person usually sits around a lot wallowing in self-pity.  Pointing critical, accusatory, and fault-finding fingers outward and skyward, but seldom back at themselves.  This type of blame game started back in the Garden of Eden.

All the while, bitterness slowly spreads like a spiritual toxin inside a soul.  However, it is hard to spot just by looking at a person, because a sweet smile on Sunday at church can hide a spirit soured by resentment the rest of the week.  Words spoken smoother than butter can mask bitterness in the heart (Psalm 55:21).  Still, God sees it all (1 Samuel 16:7, Hebrews 4:13).

Our Father cannot show anybody a more excellent and better way, if they should ever be in the galls of bitterness (1 Corinthians 12:31, Acts 8:23).  Why? Well, with God, it keeps people bound in the bonds of iniquity and sin (Acts 8:23).  Bitterness is any feeling He has dealt (or is dealing) unfairly or unjustly, and this isn’t possible (Ezekiel 33:20, Deuteronomy 32:4).

Everything past in our life is required by God, and it will be this way as long as we live (Ecclesiastes 3:15). However, how will He ever create a new path in the wilderness if we keep looking back over our shoulder in remembrance of the bad things from days gone by making us bitter now (Isaiah 43:18-19)?  Repeatedly rehashing them leaves little room for future hopes.

God will never cause us grief or afflict us willingly – there always a reason (Lamentations 3:32-33).  It’s just that we are not to know the times or seasons He has put in His own power (Acts 1:7).  Faith and belief says we trust in Him, and He knows what He’s doing – even if we don’t understand (Proverbs 3:5-6).  We either grow better from trials and troubles, or bitter.

Bitterness is also feelings of resentment with God – and there can be a wide variety of reasons why.  One could be some private displeasure about blessings He certainly seems to bestowing on others from above – when we think we are the ones showing Him much more love than they are – and that we should be the recipients.  It creates a sense of indignation inside us.

When these feelings of resentment get released out into the open, expressed in words or actions, it is how Christianity can start feeling like it is nothing more than a tense, stressful contest.  It becomes ungodly. There’s lack of contentment.  Believers start unwisely comparing and measuring aspects of their walk with God against those of others (2 Corinthians 10:12).

In turn, this creates an uneasy air of contention, and generates confusion God never authors (1 Corinthians 14:33).  It is a precursor to every evil work within the churches (James 3:14-16).  It births sinful pride and the evil rejoicing of boastings (James 4:16).  This is how believers become apostates by serving Satan more than God (Romans 1:25,30, 2 Timothy 3:1-2).

We are all prime candidates for bitterness, if we ever become weary of life, or in our walk with the Lord (Job 10:1).  Relationships, jobs, finances, Christianity, etc. – are not creating the better lives we hoped they would at their outset.  We can get to a point where we think “What’s the point?”  This is vanity – useless, a waste of time, and not producing desired results.

We have to be careful and prayerful our belief does not end up being in vain (1 Corinthians 15:2).  Bitter roots cannot possibly produce the spiritual fruits God commands us to continually bring forth – meet for repentance (Galatians 5:22-23, Matthew 3:8, Acts 17:30).  Instead, they bring forth toxic, spoiled, and worldly fruits like resentment, anger, and envy.

Whatever the reasons for bitterness, they are all displeasing to God.  Bitterness prevents Christians from following peace and holiness with all men below heaven, and keeps them out because of it (Hebrews 12:14-15).  It breeds contention, birthed only from foolish pride (Proverbs 13:10), with others and Him. Contention creates conflict and friction – not peace.

Bitter Christians don’t think right thoughts (Philippians 4:8-9).  It means they cannot have victorious walks with Jesus in such vexed states of mind.  The final 13 paragraphs from the Charming Health website (with some personal additions and Scripture support) give an extensive and excellent description of bitterness, as well as the inner and outer damage it causes:

Bitterness is emotional suicide.  It’s like drinking poison, and then hoping the other person gets ill. People embroiled in bitterness have an incredible memory for the tiniest little details, and they wallow in puddles of self-pity and resentment.  They record every offense in their heart and head – more than ready to show others how much they have been hurt.

Bitter people defend and carry grudges constantly. They feel they have been hurt too deeply and too often, and think this exempts them from their need to forgive (Matthew 6:14-15).  Their hearts can overflow with so much resentment, they no longer have any capacity to love.  Bitterness takes their soul captive, consuming positive emotions, and robs them of joy.

Bitterness is frozen anger in latent form.  When it is manifested, it becomes a vicious malignancy making one extremely vulnerable to very unwise choices and decisions, developing destructive thought patterns infiltrating body and soul.  It saps the mind’s vitality. If allowed to fester unaddressed, bitterness can pave a path to seeking out vengeance and acts of violence.

Failure to confess and correct bitterness causes it to spread like a cancer no longer in remission.  Unlike a physical kind confined to just one body, bitterness is a spiritual kind infecting and sickening others.  It’s often expressed as anger, jealousy, dissatisfaction, or hate. It keeps focus below, on getting back or even, but not getting and staying on the narrow path to heaven.

It is true many life events can be unpleasant, causing grief and pain.  However, responding in any prolonged bitterness fuels more bitterness far down the road.  A reservoir of resentment is drawn upon over and over. It can be passed down to children and hold people in its vice-like grips.  It can even generate fiery, deadly feuds between families, like the Hatfields and McCoys.

Some of these events can be quite sudden, such as the literal loss of a loved one, or a source of income. Some are subtler, happening more slowly over time such as the loss of reputation, social status within a group, or control.  Regardless, they all sow and grow bitter roots and fruits.  Resentment and bitterness are unacceptable to God as they’re self-defeating and sin.

Existing bitterness in a Christian means they are not abiding side by side with God, so He can burn up the unrighteous roots producing such resentment (John 15:1-6).  These roots cannot bring forth anything but rotten fruits defiling a soul.  Some of them are guilt, arrogance, frustration, surmising, melancholy, sloth, and envy, creating instability in mind and spirit.

Extended bitterness produces physical ailments like insomnia, ulcers, anxiety, fear, depression, and heart attacks.  Mental consequences are hyper-critical views and attitudes about life.  Nobody can do things right (including God) except the bitter person.  Those who associate with such souls may sympathize for a time, but can end up avoiding them, lest they get drawn in.

Still, we are responsible for what we say, think, and feel.  God’s plan is to make us better so we can enter into heaven – not bitter so we cannot.  What makes people so bitter are worldly attitudes they develop growing up, and then carry in life towards situations and others.  As Christians, we’re being transformed by His truth, so old ways aren’t conformed to again.

Continuing in bitterness is not rooted and grounded in God’s love within through the power of the Holy Ghost (Ephesians 3:16-17).  It is building faith upon a faulty foundation (Luke 6:47-49, 1 Corinthians 3:11).  It is not repenting (Luke 13:3,5).  Perishing awaits, unless one is purified by obeying the truth through the Spirit, unto unfeigned and fervent love of all (1 Peter 1:22).

God cannot possibly work His good will and pleasure in bitter hearts (Philippians 2:13).  Those battling with Him and others in futile resistance to His ways, and in refusal to His voice (Hebrews 12:25).  It’s enough to wrestle against the rulers of darkness in this world (Ephesians 6:12), without having to get into bitter, resentful wars with heaven and the brethren as well.

If we are being humbly obedient to God (Philippians 2:8) we are submitting to His power inside us.  We are not to resist it (Romans 13:2), as it’s the only power we will ever get to put off all forms of malice (second lead verse).  External means or methods, including guidance from other Christians, cannot cure bitterness.  All they do is give place to the devil.

Characterized by hostility (not hospitality) bitterness brings forth unforgiving, sputtering, and backsliding spirits full of negative attitudes almost always plotting and scheming, along with grouchy and complaining mouths.  Love can certainly dispel it all, but it spells disaster if left uncorrected.  Satan’s job is to devour, destroy, and kill souls – exactly what bitterness does.

 

 

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KJV and NKJV Scripture

–  Neither filthiness, nor foolish talking, nor jesting, which are not fitting, but rather giving of thanks. – Ephesians 5:4

– Foolish talking and jesting aren’t the ways in which Christian cheerfulness should ever express itself, but rather giving of thanks.  A relationship with Jesus is the source of all joy and gladness in life.  Expressed in gratitude and praise, not jokes – from Charles Hodge

The word jesting means to joke around, fool around, tease, and make wise cracks.  It can involve tossing around a little sarcasm now and then.  Intents to jest are behind the generation of comedy routines and sketches.  However, even if done in social situations, usually among family and friends well-acquainted with each other, it is often labeled as “just having fun.”

However, there isn’t anything funny about faith, and there isn’t anything comical about Christianity – or being a believer.  All foolish talking leads to foolish walking, and not redeeming the time wisely as God commands us to (Ephesians 5:15-16).  Christ did not go around cracking jokes, poking fun at people, or engaging in good-natured ribbing with any person.

We never read of Jesus saying things like “I didn’t mean to hurt you with that joke.  I was just kidding.” Christ only spoke words given by God (John 12:49), and God does not joke around.  Eternity is not a laughing matter.  It is nothing to make light of, – as the marriage dinner parable points out (Matthew 22:1-5).  There isn’t any levity in being left behind.

God warns us throughout His Word about the effect our words have on others.  Life and death are in the power of the tongue (Proverbs 18:21).  However, mouths speak out of the heart’s abundance (Luke 6:45).  Filling up on the world brings forth foolish talking, wise cracking, sarcasm, and jesting.  Filling up on the Word brings forth joy in Jesus; not jokes.

No matter how harmless any attempts at humor may seem, they can stab at, then pierce somebody’s heart (Proverbs 12:18).  Reopening emotional wounds from years ago, scars the recipient of the jesting thought were finally healed.  New damage and pain perhaps never intended is created, even if the injured soul laughs it off like it did not hurt – when it really did.

As innocent as jesting might appear, it is not godly. Seemingly gentle teasing can easily cross the line into some taunting, an emotional form of bullying.  Making wise cracks is not only showing a lack of wisdom, but failing to ask God for it (James 1:5), so jesting stops. Sarcasm, from the Greek “sarkazein” (to strip off the flesh) – is a close cousin of scoffing and mockery.

Scoffing God will mark man’s last days as scores walk after their own lusts (2 Peter 3:3).  And, God will not be mocked (Galatians 6:7).  Both Abraham and Sarah scoffed at and mocked God’s promise to deliver them a child in their advanced ages (Genesis 17:17, 18:11-15).  Even though both laughed silently in their heart, God heard, and didn’t see any humor in the situation.

Justification of sins does not involve jesting, foolish talking is not expressing faith, and holiness does not include humor.  It all does involve humble obedience (Philippians 2:8), and mutual abidance (John 15:1-6). One cannot continue the “just kidding” comments of jesting, the wise cracking comedy of the old man, and learn Christ as commanded (Ephesians 4:20-32).

 

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