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Posts Tagged ‘Lord’


KJV and NKJV Scripture

– A lord on whose hand the king leaned, answered the man of God and said, “Behold, if the Lord would make windows in heaven, might this thing be?”  And, Elisha said, “Behold, you will see it with your own eyes – but you shall not eat thereof.” – 2 Kings 7:2

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could have windows in heaven to see what goes on behind the Pearly Gates on a regular basis?  A lord back in the Old Testament wanted such a thing – because he would not take God at His word.  Even though He had already promised to end a long Samarian famine in exactly 24 hours and provided exact details about the provisions, He didn’t say how it would come to pass (2 Kings 7:1,3-16).

Despite God’s assurance, all this lord could see were dry skies and hear nothing but the rumbling of empty, hungry stomachs.  He could not perceive anything but more starvation.  So, he wanted some proof – not a promise.  Well, God delivered as declared.  Everyone had food to eat and share.  Except this man – whose doubt shut him out from the bounty.  God killed him for his lack of faith (2 King 7:17-20, Hebrews 11:1).

There’s an old saying of “Be careful what you wish for.”  What we may want to have or see, can be quite different when actually before us.  It can be a far cry from what we might have perfectly imagined in our minds beforehand.  Many may wonder what a God who does not sleep (Psalm 121:4) keeps busy with sitting upon this earth’s circle (Isaiah 40:22).  What would we really see if we could peek into heaven?

Would we see how God goes about performing a much-needed miracle in someone’s life?  Perhaps. Would we view how He arranges for an unexpected blessing to be bestowed on a desperate soul?  Maybe. Would we witness how He orchestrates the death of someone?  Well, this is exactly what we read about in 1 Kings as God asks all the host of heaven who will execute His evil upon King Ahab (1 Kings 22:19-21).

Why?  Ahab had hardened his heart against heaven (Hebrews 3:15).  Following after idols and working much wickedness in the Lord’s sight (1 Kings 21:25-26).  Repeatedly disobeying God – until God cut Ahab off without remedy (Proverbs 29:1).  Sending down an angel to make Ahab’s prophets lie to him (1 Kings 22:22-23) – so he would go to Ramoth-Gilead as he wanted all along, and die there (1 Kings 22:29-37).

Heaven doesn’t have windows for good reason.  We could see God creating evil (Isaiah 45:7) – and not pleasing things.  We would not have any need for the spiritual work of believing a God we can’t see (John 1:18, John 6:29) – if we could see all He was doing   Nor would we have to live by faith (Romans 1:17). We could just turn our faces to the sky and witness how and why some things happen – and some don’t.

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BITTERNESS


KJV and NKJV Scripture

– Looking diligently, lest any fall of the grace of God. Lest any root of bitterness springing up trouble you, and thereby many be defiled. – Hebrews 12:15

– Let all bitterness, and wrath, and anger, and clamour, and evil speaking be put away from you – with all malice. – Ephesians 4:31

Bitterness towards life, or the Lord, arises out of false perceptions it brings that things aren’t quite working out how a person hoped they would at some prior point.  Notions of rewarding jobs, joyous marriages, riches, etc. – never materialized – and fault always lies with others (including God).  So, the bitter soul stews and simmers on, with unhealthy views of life.

However, instead of doing anything about it, often born out of a “why bother” mind, because nothing has really worked out before, the bitter person usually sits around a lot wallowing in self-pity.  Pointing critical, accusatory, and fault-finding fingers outward and skyward, but seldom back at themselves.  This type of blame game started back in the Garden of Eden.

All the while, bitterness slowly spreads like a spiritual toxin inside a soul.  However, it is hard to spot just by looking at a person, because a sweet smile on Sunday at church can hide a spirit soured by resentment the rest of the week.  Words spoken smoother than butter can mask bitterness in the heart (Psalm 55:21).  Still, God sees it all (1 Samuel 16:7, Hebrews 4:13).

Our Father cannot show anybody a more excellent and better way, if they should ever be in the galls of bitterness (1 Corinthians 12:31, Acts 8:23).  Why? Well, with God, it keeps people bound in the bonds of iniquity and sin (Acts 8:23).  Bitterness is any feeling He has dealt (or is dealing) unfairly or unjustly, and this isn’t possible (Ezekiel 33:20, Deuteronomy 32:4).

Everything past in our life is required by God, and it will be this way as long as we live (Ecclesiastes 3:15). However, how will He ever create a new path in the wilderness if we keep looking back over our shoulder in remembrance of the bad things from days gone by making us bitter now (Isaiah 43:18-19)?  Repeatedly rehashing them leaves little room for future hopes.

God will never cause us grief or afflict us willingly – there always a reason (Lamentations 3:32-33).  It’s just that we are not to know the times or seasons He has put in His own power (Acts 1:7).  Faith and belief says we trust in Him, and He knows what He’s doing – even if we don’t understand (Proverbs 3:5-6).  We either grow better from trials and troubles, or bitter.

Bitterness is also feelings of resentment with God – and there can be a wide variety of reasons why.  One could be some private displeasure about blessings He certainly seems to bestowing on others from above – when we think we are the ones showing Him much more love than they are – and that we should be the recipients.  It creates a sense of indignation inside us.

When these feelings of resentment get released out into the open, expressed in words or actions, it is how Christianity can start feeling like it is nothing more than a tense, stressful contest.  It becomes ungodly. There’s lack of contentment.  Believers start unwisely comparing and measuring aspects of their walk with God against those of others (2 Corinthians 10:12).

In turn, this creates an uneasy air of contention, and generates confusion God never authors (1 Corinthians 14:33).  It is a precursor to every evil work within the churches (James 3:14-16).  It births sinful pride and the evil rejoicing of boastings (James 4:16).  This is how believers become apostates by serving Satan more than God (Romans 1:25,30, 2 Timothy 3:1-2).

We are all prime candidates for bitterness, if we ever become weary of life, or in our walk with the Lord (Job 10:1).  Relationships, jobs, finances, Christianity, etc. – are not creating the better lives we hoped they would at their outset.  We can get to a point where we think “What’s the point?”  This is vanity – useless, a waste of time, and not producing desired results.

We have to be careful and prayerful our belief does not end up being in vain (1 Corinthians 15:2).  Bitter roots cannot possibly produce the spiritual fruits God commands us to continually bring forth – meet for repentance (Galatians 5:22-23, Matthew 3:8, Acts 17:30).  Instead, they bring forth toxic, spoiled, and worldly fruits like resentment, anger, and envy.

Whatever the reasons for bitterness, they are all displeasing to God.  Bitterness prevents Christians from following peace and holiness with all men below heaven, and keeps them out because of it (Hebrews 12:14-15).  It breeds contention, birthed only from foolish pride (Proverbs 13:10), with others and Him. Contention creates conflict and friction – not peace.

Bitter Christians don’t think right thoughts (Philippians 4:8-9).  It means they cannot have victorious walks with Jesus in such vexed states of mind.  The final 13 paragraphs from the Charming Health website (with some personal additions and Scripture support) give an extensive and excellent description of bitterness, as well as the inner and outer damage it causes:

Bitterness is emotional suicide.  It’s like drinking poison, and then hoping the other person gets ill. People embroiled in bitterness have an incredible memory for the tiniest little details, and they wallow in puddles of self-pity and resentment.  They record every offense in their heart and head – more than ready to show others how much they have been hurt.

Bitter people defend and carry grudges constantly. They feel they have been hurt too deeply and too often, and think this exempts them from their need to forgive (Matthew 6:14-15).  Their hearts can overflow with so much resentment, they no longer have any capacity to love.  Bitterness takes their soul captive, consuming positive emotions, and robs them of joy.

Bitterness is frozen anger in latent form.  When it is manifested, it becomes a vicious malignancy making one extremely vulnerable to very unwise choices and decisions, developing destructive thought patterns infiltrating body and soul.  It saps the mind’s vitality. If allowed to fester unaddressed, bitterness can pave a path to seeking out vengeance and acts of violence.

Failure to confess and correct bitterness causes it to spread like a cancer no longer in remission.  Unlike a physical kind confined to just one body, bitterness is a spiritual kind infecting and sickening others.  It’s often expressed as anger, jealousy, dissatisfaction, or hate. It keeps focus below, on getting back or even, but not getting and staying on the narrow path to heaven.

It is true many life events can be unpleasant, causing grief and pain.  However, responding in any prolonged bitterness fuels more bitterness far down the road.  A reservoir of resentment is drawn upon over and over. It can be passed down to children and hold people in its vice-like grips.  It can even generate fiery, deadly feuds between families, like the Hatfields and McCoys.

Some of these events can be quite sudden, such as the literal loss of a loved one, or a source of income. Some are subtler, happening more slowly over time such as the loss of reputation, social status within a group, or control.  Regardless, they all sow and grow bitter roots and fruits.  Resentment and bitterness are unacceptable to God as they’re self-defeating and sin.

Existing bitterness in a Christian means they are not abiding side by side with God, so He can burn up the unrighteous roots producing such resentment (John 15:1-6).  These roots cannot bring forth anything but rotten fruits defiling a soul.  Some of them are guilt, arrogance, frustration, surmising, melancholy, sloth, and envy, creating instability in mind and spirit.

Extended bitterness produces physical ailments like insomnia, ulcers, anxiety, fear, depression, and heart attacks.  Mental consequences are hyper-critical views and attitudes about life.  Nobody can do things right (including God) except the bitter person.  Those who associate with such souls may sympathize for a time, but can end up avoiding them, lest they get drawn in.

Still, we are responsible for what we say, think, and feel.  God’s plan is to make us better so we can enter into heaven – not bitter so we cannot.  What makes people so bitter are worldly attitudes they develop growing up, and then carry in life towards situations and others.  As Christians, we’re being transformed by His truth, so old ways aren’t conformed to again.

Continuing in bitterness is not rooted and grounded in God’s love within through the power of the Holy Ghost (Ephesians 3:16-17).  It is building faith upon a faulty foundation (Luke 6:47-49, 1 Corinthians 3:11).  It is not repenting (Luke 13:3,5).  Perishing awaits, unless one is purified by obeying the truth through the Spirit, unto unfeigned and fervent love of all (1 Peter 1:22).

God cannot possibly work His good will and pleasure in bitter hearts (Philippians 2:13).  Those battling with Him and others in futile resistance to His ways, and in refusal to His voice (Hebrews 12:25).  It’s enough to wrestle against the rulers of darkness in this world (Ephesians 6:12), without having to get into bitter, resentful wars with heaven and the brethren as well.

If we are being humbly obedient to God (Philippians 2:8) we are submitting to His power inside us.  We are not to resist it (Romans 13:2), as it’s the only power we will ever get to put off all forms of malice (second lead verse).  External means or methods, including guidance from other Christians, cannot cure bitterness.  All they do is give place to the devil.

Characterized by hostility (not hospitality) bitterness brings forth unforgiving, sputtering, and backsliding spirits full of negative attitudes almost always plotting and scheming, along with grouchy and complaining mouths.  Love can certainly dispel it all, but it spells disaster if left uncorrected.  Satan’s job is to devour, destroy, and kill souls – exactly what bitterness does.

 

 

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(KJV and NKJV Scripture)

– He who heeds the Word wisely shall find good – and whoever trusts in the Lord; happy is he. – Proverbs 16:20

– God may allow His servant to succeed when He has disciplined him to a point where he does not need success to be happy.  The man elated by success but cast down by failure is still a carnal man.  At best his fruit will have a worm in it. – A.W. Tozer

The world will give us 1,000-plus suggestions and solutions throughout our lives on how to become – and stay happy.  Some may seem to “work” for us – for various amounts of time.  A successful and strong marriage – or lots of bucks in our bank account – can deceive us into making that decision we are finally “happy” once and for all.  Until our worst fears are realized one day – when it goes away (Job 3:25).

Until perhaps – a person who swore up and down they would love you forever and never leave – gets up the very next morning and walks away without warning.  Or, maybe a major medical event drains life savings; money you may have set aside to enjoy retirement.  A once happy time has led to hardships, hurt, and heartache, and people start hunting for happiness all over again.  It can all be exhausting. 

This world’s ways to attain and maintain happiness are all quite cosmetic and conditional – contingent upon its motions and our emotions.  Trying to stay happy like this often puts us on a daily roller-coaster ride of highs and lows.  Somewhere on the straight and flat parts when we can breathe, we attempt to figure out if we are truly happy inside our hearts, or if saying such is just hollow words from our lips.

Empty souls lead to envy and covetousness (Titus 3:3, Luke 12:15).  We might see what someone else has in the way of possessions – or look at ways they are living – and it appears to be making them happy – so we try to follow suit.  Without us ever really knowing if they’re masking happiness with fake smiles and feigned words – but who are also still searching for lasting satisfaction inside (Proverbs 27:20).

God – and the ways of His Word to attain happiness are to provide us a continual and steady sense of contentment and happiness.  It’s internal, so this feeling should always stay the same, regardless of any external situation (Philippians 4:11).  All of God’s promises are yeses (2 Corinthians 1:20).  We truly can attain such happiness without it ever wavering; but it has to be achieved His way (Proverbs 1:7).

Happiness starts with heavenly discipline – and He assures all born again Christians (John 3:5) this will happen because of His love.  It will not seem joyous – and we won’t feel happy while it’s happening to us (Hebrews 12:6-11).  However, God’s intent is for us to yield all the peaceable fruits required to be brought forth in keeping with His commandment to repent (Matthew 3:8, Galatians 5:22-23, Acts 17:30).

Therefore, “choosing” or “deciding” to be happy as a Christian is not the way it works – for such will lead to the same spiritual highs and lows this world’s way to happiness creates.  It puts us on a roller coaster ride full of sudden dips and rises in our faith.  Therefore, our road to lasting happiness begins with heavenly discipline – and we’re to be happy when God corrects us.  We’re not to despise His chastening (Job 5:17).

All of this daily discipline is designed to teach the patience God requires of us to endure until the end – and made partakers of Jesus Christ (James 5:11, Hebrews 3:14, Hebrews 10:36).  This means our salvation.  We may have to endure many temptations and trials, depending on how much of our old worldly man God has to correct (2 Corinthians 5:17).  We are to count it all joy; regardless (James 1:2-4).

So, when we suffer for righteousness’ sake, we will be happy (1 Peter 3:14).  So, when we are reproached for the name of Christ, we’ll be happy (1 Peter 4:14). So, we learn to be happy having faith to ourselves (Romans 14:22).  So we do not turn Christianity into a competition – and a battle for happiness between believers – for such leads to every evil work before God (2 Corinthians 10:12, James 3:14-16).

If we are not continually happy as Christians, we have nowhere near the trust in God we may claim – nor are we really following in Christ’s steps (lead verse, Luke 6:46, 1 Peter 2:21).  Our happiness is still contingent on a constantly changing world.  It all usually hinges on whether life is basically going the way we want it to – or not at any given time – not upon a God who never changes (Malachi 3:6).

A.W Tozer, who wrote the lead quote above, once said that if we want to be happy as Christians, we have to be made holy from above – for this is God’s desire for us the second He draws us to the Cross (John 6:44, 1 Peter 1:16).  From this point on, we should be simply seeking to know – and to do His will each day (Romans 12:2, Ephesians 5:17) – and leaving it to Jesus the matter of how happy we are.

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(NKJV and KJV Scripture)

Give us this day our daily bread. – Luke 11:3

– “Behold, the days come,” says the Lord, “that I will send a famine in the land, not a famine of bread, nor a thirst of water – but of hearing the words of the Lord.” – Amos 8:11

The Bible is our living water – and our daily bread (John 7:38, lead verse).  It is where we get our faith (Romans 10:17).  If our souls are not receiving their sustenance from Scripture, then where?  What are we feeding our hearts with, and filling up on?  If not the justice and truths of the Word – first its spiritual milk, then meat (1 Peter 2:2, Hebrews 5:14) – won’t our food be the junk and lies of this world?

Is our nourishment coming from its seemingly endless needs and wants?  Those God has already assured us He will provide – knowing what they are beforehand – so we don’t have to worry about them (Psalm 23:1, Matthew 6:8, Philippians 4:19, 1 Peter 5:7).  Or, manna from heaven – from which He can divide and multiply the most minutest of morsels – and feed multitudes with (Matthew 14:19-21).

Without partaking of God’s daily bread – our lives can become stale and stagnant.  We can start to stumble as they begin to crumble – and we trip over the very wreckage of worldly lives we built up for ourselves. Ones we may have thought would fill our souls once and for all.  But, we’re starving for satisfaction once again – food to ease the hunger pains in our hearts.

People all over this planet are suffering from physical hunger – much of it caused by famine.  However, there seems to be a greater drought – a spiritual one created by a lack of hope in many human hearts – and a sense of no way out.  As believers, our job is to put our hands to the plow – sowing seeds of salvation – and not looking back (Luke 9:62).

Our seed is God’s Word (Luke 8:11).  Our message is the Messiah – all of mankind’s only hope of being made partakers of His eternal and heavenly meal – a supper being prepared for those of us who seek out the poor, maimed, halt and blind (Luke 14:16-24). Blessed are we who do this, and who shall eat bread in the kingdom of God (Luke 14:15).

Our Father is long-suffering towards all – but He has limits (2 Peter 3:9).  The time is coming when God will send a famine in the land – a famine for hearing His Word (second lead verse).  And people shall wander from sea to sea, and from the north to the east; they shall run to and fro seeking it – and not be able to find it (Amos 8:12).

The clock is ticking closer to the midnight hour when our bridegroom in Christ returns (Matthew 25:6).  A heavenly banquet awaits.  Where there will be no more hunger or thirst – no pains of starvation, no parchment from lack of water – ever again (Revelation 7:16).  Let’s help others become partakers of eternal bread – before it’s too late.

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(NKJV and KJV Scripture)

– He gives power to the faint – and to them that have no might, He increases strength. – Isaiah 40:29

– Do we provoke the Lord to jealousy?  Are we stronger than He? – 1 Corinthians 10:22

This world tends to tell us we have to be tough and strong to make it through these lives on earth.  We can’t show any sign of external weakness – even though we may be wondering inside how much longer we’re going to be able to take everything life throws at us – which can be a lot; at the times we may want it the least.  But – we have no power to do anything – except by that which comes from above (John 19:11, Acts 17:28).

Are we provoking God to jealousy (second lead verse) – if or when we try to be “tougher-than nails?”?  As if He was admiring our self-perceived power and strength.  Whenever we believe we are wise and mighty in our worldly ways – and can weather any storm thrown at us by our own strength and smarts, we’ll that’s conceit.  We’re not admitting weakness.  And, we’ll most likely end up being confounded (Proverbs 3:5-6, Romans 12:16, 1 Corinthians 1:27).

This is not why God hung Jesus on the Cross – so the Son of man could be tougher than nails for all of us – all the time.  We can’t just hand things over to Him only when we’re tired of doing so – finally weary of having to be strong all the time – to prove or show to others we are not wimps.  God’s grace is only sufficient – and His mighty strength is only perfected in our weakness – when we glory in our infirmities, not our invincibility (2 Corinthians 12:9).

Only when we admit we are weak in the world, can God be strong through His Word – so the power of Christ can rest upon us (2 Corinthians 12:10).  If we pass on His power within us as Christians (Romans 13:2) – because we still prefer trying to prevail through thick and thin by ourselves, hanging on to handling life our way – He’ll probably keep right on letting us thinking we are strong without Him. That’s pride – and God resists anyone like that (James 4:6).

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(NKJV and KJV Scripture)

– All day long have I stretched forth my hands unto a disobedient and gainsaying people. – Romans 10:21

The Lord is my shepherd – I shall not want. – Psalm 23:1

All of use are to give thanks always, for all things unto God (Ephesians 5:20).  Not just for all the things we always want to have in this world – at any given point in time.  Any desire to gain goods – and the good of this world; and then receiving such – is not a reason to say we love the Lord – because He has answered our prayers accordingly in this regard. This creates a very conditional Christian.  It leads to disobedience.

Where our contentment and faith is founded on how much we can get from Him – and how many blessings He can bestow on us because we call ourselves believers.  How difficult will this make it for us to give as purposed in our hearts – from such things as we already have.  With cheer – not grudgingly, or out of any necessity for ourselves in return (2 Corinthians 8:11-14, 2 Corinthians 9:7, Hebrews 13:5)

Only by pride comes contention (Proverbs 13:10).  If we’re not content with our wages, or trying to exact more than what God has already appointed us – won’t we become contentious; desiring gain  – and becoming ungodly in the process (Luke 3:13-14, 1 Timothy 6:6)?  This can create a very bumpy walk with God; like we’re on a roller-coaster ride – where we’re never content in our current state (Philippians 4:11).

Our souls soar high when our eyes are satisfied with worldly things (Proverbs 27:20) – then sink when we suffer loss; especially people we don’t want to leave yet.  This world whizzes by daily with all its wants and temptations – and it can make us dizzy with desire.  If we long for such things – and base our love of the Lord on getting them, how can we count it all as loss in order to gain Him (Philippians 3:7-8)?

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(NKJV and KJV Scripture)

– And you shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free. – John 8:32

– Pilate said unto him (Jesus), “What is truth?” – John 18:38

A man is on trial for murder.  Under oath, many witnesses come forth to give complete and truthful testimony.  The jury then goes to deliberate.  A unanimous guilty verdict is reached.  When the sentence is handed down by the judge – it’s death. A pardon is out of the question.  There is no escape.

Truth has not freed him  So how can God’s truth set us free?  From what?  This man was going to die because of it.  Outside of prison before his crime, he wasn’t in bondage to anyone – now he was bound to die by truth.  By our understanding, knowing truth this way doesn’t make much sense (Proverbs 3:5-6).

The Jews who Jesus was speaking to (lead verse), also could not figure out what Christ was talking about in regards to truth.  How could it free them if they had never been in bondage to any man?  They could not believe anything Jesus was telling them about truth (John 8:33,45-46).

Truth can set us free – or sentence us to die.  How can it possibly be both?  Because truth is a judgment – a verdict.  It’s saying something is or isn’t – without any room for doubt.  Isn’t that what we really want from truth?  Isn’t it why we want people to tell the whole truth and nothing but it in court?

The word verdict comes from the old Anglo-French “verdit” – meaning “to say a truth”.  Christ often prefaced parables and teachings with the word “verily”, or “truly”.  It is impossible for God to lie (Hebrews 6:18), so Jesus could only say what was true – or wasn’t – without error.

We are all appointed once to die (Hebrews 9:27).  It’s God’s verdict against us from our very first day on earth.  Although He has not appointed us to wrath, Scripture has concluded all are under sin – carrying with it the sentence of death (1 Thessalonians 5:9, Galatians 3:22, 2 Corinthians 1:9).

Our Father hung the only truth on the Cross.  So we would no longer trust in ourselves, nor in our desperately wicked and deceitful heats any more – but in the One who raises the dead (2 Corinthians 1:9, Jeremiah 17:9, Proverbs 28:26).  We can’t deliver ourselves from the grave.

By God’s grace Christ tasted death for all men (Hebrews 2:9).  Jesus took the place of sin on the Cross.  Christ became our pardon from death, becoming the propitiation (atoning sacrifice) for the sins of the world – while we were all yet sinners (1 John 2:2, Romans 5:8).

Jesus took part of flesh and blood like us, so through death he might destroy him who had the power of death – the devil.  To deliver us all from our fear of death, which we are in bondage to all our lives.  To free us from death’s finality, through God’s truth (Hebrews 2:14-15).

We’ve been turned from the power of darkness, and the father of all lies (John 8:44, Acts 26:18), unto the promise of deliverance through our Father’s truth.  But, death will be the last enemy to be destroyed (1 Corinthians 15:26).  We’re not free from the devil yet (1 Peter 5:8-9).

We will be freed from the grave by God’s grace – and through our faith in Jesus.  However, this grace will brought to us at the revelation of Christ (1 Peter 1:13).  We are not free in the meantime to grieve God by sinning more as believers – so His grace can abound more (Romans 6:1).

Whenever there is new-found freedom in life, there is the very real potential of it being abused and misused.  The meaning of liberty can be lost through misinterpretation.  Between what the grantor or giver of it intended – and what the recipient decides for themselves it means.

Discipline gets degraded this way.  Teenagers who first get their license to drive may often feel like they can go anywhere – and do anything they want, because their travels are no longer under direct parental oversight.  It is a similar scene when kids leave home for college.

We have the Holy Spirit dwelling in us by faith as believers (Ephesians 3:17).  Jesus Christ is that Spirit – and where the Spirit is, there is liberty (2 Corinthians 3:17).  We are to stand fast – not becoming entangled again in a yoke of bondage to this world (Galatians 5:1, 2 Corinthians 7:10).

We have been freed from the pollution of this world – by the Word of truth.  This is by knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ – who overcame the world (John 16:33).  If we become entangled in it again and overcome – our end is worse than the beginning (2 Peter 2:20-21).

The Lord’s liberty is not a license to turn us loose, and turn His grace into lasciviousness (Jude 4).  God tells us to take heed, lest our freedom become a stumbling block to those who are weak (1 Corinthians 8:9).  It is not to be used as a covering for evil either (2 Peter 2:16).

We are to use this liberty to be God’s servants. Serving Him by serving one another in love (2 Peter 2:16, Galatians 5:13).  If we look into this perfect law of liberty and continue in it – not being forgetful hearers, but doers of the work – we shall be blessed in our deeds (James 1:25).

Once creatures, we’ve been delivered from the bondage of corruption into the glorious liberty of becoming God’s children (Romans 8:21).  If we use free will to sin willfully after receiving the knowledge of His truth – we’re not wise.  There is no more sacrifice for sin (Hebrews 10:26).

God brings His judgement to light every morning (Zephaniah 3:5).  A verdict is reached as to whether His mercy will keep us waking each day – or if we are cut off without remedy (Zephaniah 3:5, Lamentations 3:22-23, Proverbs 29:1).  It is His truth which continually preserves us (Psalm 40:11).

If the Son has set us free, we are free indeed (John 8:36).  However, we have to remain steadfast in our faith until the end to be made partakers of Christ (Hebrews 3:6,14).  If we ever hold God’s truth in unrighteousness, we can become subject to His wrath (Romans 1:18).

We can start serving the creature again – more than the Creator – turning His truth back to a lie (Romans 1:25).  Having been enlightened, and having tasted of the heavenly gift, we can still fall away to where it’s impossible for God to renew us again to repentance (Hebrews 6:4-6).

This is like hanging Christ back on the Cross and subjecting God to open shame (Hebrews 6:6).  For things such as these, He has the power to turn us over to reprobate minds – and do things we might think we could never do  – and long to be free of once again (Romans 1:28-32).

Witnesses came forth in the first paragraph above – their truthful testimony meant a mortal man would be killed for his crime.  Though Christ gave truthful testimony about mortal man, some wanted to kill him, for committing nothing worthy of death (John 8:40, Luke 23:15).

Man’s testimony in a human court can send a man to die.  God’s testimony from His heavenly court; the crucifixion and resurrection of His only Son – sets us free from death.  It doesn’t set us free to do whatever we want in the world – or with the Word – as Christians.

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