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Posts Tagged ‘distrust’


(KJV and NKJV Scripture)

– Casting all your cares on Him, for He cares for you. – 1 Peter 5:7

– There is nothing that wastes the body like worry, and one who has any faith in God should be ashamed to worry about anything whatsoever. – Gandhi

Ann Voskamp once wrote, “Worry is faith gone wrong, because we don’t believe God will get it right.”  Worry is mental anxiety and unease – allowing our minds to dwell daily on difficulties or troubles.  Bringing forth brooding about future days we may never see – often accompanied by much over-thinking.  Worry saps our emotional and spiritual strength, and sabotages our joy (2 Corinthians 12:9, 1 John 1:4).

Our next days in life may never come – and if they do, they don’t promise us anything but another day to live by faith (Romans 1:17, Hebrews 11:1).  Still, as Carly Simon once sang “we think about these days anyway” – and we worry about them.  We tend to preface worry with “what ifs?” about days down the road – when we never know what a single one will ever bring forth (Proverbs 27:1, James 4:14).

“What if we don’t have enough money for our kid’s education or retirement?  What if we outlive money we have saved up?”  Or, “What if my fiance – the one I truly thought was my forever, develops cold feet and backs out of our engagement?”  We can even worry whether the person we may be with now is truly the right mate for us.  Even when we sense they might be wrong, we’re worried about being single – so we stay.

Then, there is always thought of what happens if we get sick and have to lose a lot of work – even having to quit.  We worry about how we’re going to cover sometimes huge medical bills without any income – or who is going to take care of us if we are single or widowed.  Worry begets more worry – and ends up with us fretting, a state of constant and visible worry. Fretting makes it hard to rest in God (Psalm 37:7).

Whatever the worry is about – we can carry it out to the utmost extremes – creating worst-case scenarios of near catastrophe.  Even Christians who may fear God and eschew evil are not exempt.  Such a calamity happened to Job after he got caught up in his own self-righteousness and pride.  Satan knew all about it and God allowed the devil to take everything from Job short of his life and wife (Job 2:6-9).

The thing he worried about and feared the most – took place within the space of 24 hours (Job 1:6-19, Job 3:25-26).  However, Job had become the focus of his own worship – wearing his righteousness and judgement like a royal robe and diadem (Job 29:14-25).  We too, should worry about His wrath if we get wrapped up in searching for our own glory (Proverbs 25:25, John 7:18).  God will not tolerate it.

Despite all our worries, anxiety over future finances can keep more people worked up – and staying awake at night than any other subject.  Still, many submit total trust to their fellow-man’s wisdom in regards to money (Proverbs 3:5, Jeremiah 17:5).  So-called financial experts everywhere try to predict how much money other people they don’t know – require for retirements they have no idea how long will last.

We are worth more to God than many sparrows.  We are not to fear the future, or worry about it (Matthew 10:31).  Worrying as Christians is not wise.  When we do, we’re saying we do not believe He knows all our future needs.  Not what we want down the road as a reward for all our earthly work, or need what the world says we need, but what He knows we require according to His Word (Psalm 23:1, Matthew 6:8).

As Joyce Meyer once said, “Worry is like us sitting in a rocking chair – and rocking in it.   We’re always in motion, moving back and forth between one worry to the next – but going nowhere.”  However, worry is a very serious spiritual problem.  It signals a feigned and very weak faith.  We may pretend everything is fine in front of others – so they don’t add worrying about us to their own worries.

If we do tell them we’re worried about something, they may say “It will all be okay” – but how do they know it is?  It’s not wrong to encourage people and make them feel better about their worries – but the best we can offer is an extension of hope.  “I  hope you get that job, I hope you find the right person, or I really hope things get better.”  For all faith is based on hope – to futures only God knows (Hebrews 11:1).

We can’t fake worry with God – He knows all the thoughts coming into our mind (Ezekiel 11:5).  What matters to us, always matters to the Almighty – and our worries are continually manifest before His eyes (Hebrews 4:12-13).  We only make our worry matters worse, when we do not cast all our cares upon Him. Claiming faith in the Word while worried in the world – is not worship.  It is distrust – and it annoys God.

It is impossible to please Him without faith, and His soul takes no pleasure in us if we should ever draw back from it (Hebrews 10:38, Hebrews 11:6).  God promises to supply all of our needs according to His riches in glory by Christ (Philippians 4:19).  We’re to be careful for nothing, but every thing by prayer and supplication, let our requests be known unto God (Philippians 4:6).  We let Him do the worrying.

If we cast our burdens upon God – He will sustain us (lead verse, Psalm 55:22).  Therefore, we are to take no thought of our life, what we shall eat, drink, or put on for clothing.  Worry causes nothing but strife, and it won’t add a single day to our life (Matthew 6:25-34).  Worry may even subtract days we could have spent serving the Lord – had we not spent so much time worrying about things He promises to handle.

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(KJV and NKJV Scripture)

– Neither let Hezekiah make you trust in the Lord, saying “The Lord will surely deliver us; this city shall not be delivered into the hand of the king of Assyria.” – Isaiah 36:15

– Faith all grown up is trust. – Adam LiVecchi

Trust in life – or in the Lord – cannot be earned and learned by talking about it.  We can’t “make” other people develop trust in us just by the movement of our mouths.  We can’t “make” other people trust in the Lord – by telling them they must – no matter how much may we have learned to do so.  Some may have to go through tough trials before they learn to trust in God as their constant refuge (Psalm 62:8).

However, there are vast differences between putting our trust in people and placing trust in God.  If we attempt to cross the lines of understanding between the two, it can be the catalyst for much confusion.   Distrust with people can develop when someone we thought we were going to trust a long time, does one questionable thing – then another; making us slowly start to doubt their overall reliability.

This makes it hard to fully trust such a person again. The more it happens, the more we learn how to distrust.  The more we learn distrust, the more we learn how to become cynical.  The more cynical we become, the more disbelieving we become.  The more any negativity enters a Christian mind – the more it feeds unbelief – and endangers salvation (Romans 11:20-21, Hebrews 3:12-19, Hebrews 4:6,11).

Cynicism and distrust give birth to mockery.  Mockery can arise from disbelieving anything good is ever going to happen – because one has pretty much lived a life of bad luck and tough breaks.  They may have believed many worldly truths – only to be burnt by as many lies.  It all creates a “Yeah, right – like any good is ever going to happen” mind.  It is not a good one to have with God (Galatians 6:7)

Trust between at least two humans is almost always two-sided and mutual.  It is an “I’ll trust you, if you trust me” outlook.  It is an “I’ll always be there for a person – but they’d better be there for me exactly when I need them” attitude.  It can take years sometimes to develop solid trust – and a single lie told in two seconds to destroy.  However, this trust is often based on our prior desires of being served

If we put initial stock in any program, person, or product – isn’t it because we want them to produce results, perform, or satisfy the way we want ahead of time?  Would we sink money into an investment program, if we had little faith our finances would improve as we might expect them to beforehand?  If we sense anything is going to fail us in advance, why would we proceed any further with trust?

If we were to hire a new baby-sitter, and they showed up late the first night – well, we might give them a second chance.  However, what if they arrived late that second night, and kept us from important dates with people?  What if we found out they did not put the kids to bed on time?  What if they asked for more money than advertised?  Would we say we trusted the baby-sitter or recommend them to others?

Would we keep buying a food product with a bitter taste – hoping it would somehow taste better – but only if we keep pulling out our wallets ?  Would we keep buying and driving a certain make of car always seeming to break down?  These are all examples of how easily we can stop trusting people and things – simply because they’re not serving our wants and desires; especially when money is involved.

Isn’t it easy to say we trust in God when He seems to show up exactly on time, every time – performing dutifully like a rugged old car or truck we have had for years.  Or, nothing about Him leaves a bad or bitter taste in our mouths?  Becoming bitter with God can happen when our Christian lives don’t seem to be getting any better for trusting Him.  It is a dangerous spiritual state to be in (Hebrews 12:15).

So, what is the big difference between human and heavenly trust?   We can say we trust other people – but as soon as they let us down a couple of times – we can often run off to find someone else to trust in. Someone new who will do what we want them to – and when.  God is not our servant – He does not exist to perform and deliver like this (Revelation 4:11). We can still say we trust Him – but for what?

We can say “In God we trust” – but He says “I trust no one but Myself  (Job 4:18).”  It is impossible for is Him to lie (Hebrews 6:18).  If He does or declares anything, it is complete truth (Deuteronomy 32:4). Even if we have the Spirit in us – flesh and Spirit lust against each other – so we can’t do the things we would (Galatians 5:17).  Therefore, we are not to trust ourselves; only Him (2 Corinthians 1:9).

Trusting God means we stop trusting man completely – for our hearts have departed from Him if we do (Jeremiah 17:5).  It means we do not stagger in unbelief because our lives are just not going the way we may have thought – by just trusting in God.  It means we’re fully persuaded He will always perform as promised.  Per His purpose and timing; not ours (Romans 4:20-21, 2 Peter 3:8, Isaiah 46:10).

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