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Posts Tagged ‘condemned’


KJV and NKJV Scripture

– Neither filthiness, neither foolish talking, neither jesting – which are not convenient; but rather giving of thanks. – Ephesians 5:4

– Jest not with the two-edged sword of God’s Word. – Thomas Fuller

Our word “jester” is derived from the Anglo-Latin “gestour” – meaning “minstrel.”  In medieval times, kings and noblemen often needed a person who could minister to the spirits of their people through the use of humor.  So, most of them had a court jester ready at their disposal to do such a thing.  These comedians were generally seen as buffoons simply brought in to brighten the moods of those in attendance, who might be brooding, frustrated, or feeling down about life.

The jester would be decked out in brightly colored clothes – to further help lighten the atmosphere of the setting.  Setting about entertaining and amusing the crowd, often cracking jokes about current events and making sarcastic wisecracks about people well-known to the audience – outside the kingdom walls, of course.  Once the show was over … so was the job of the jester.  They weren’t taken seriously by anyone who might meet they walking the streets afterwards.

In the modern world, jesters are typically known as comics.  They are found almost anywhere around the world, and people typically pay money to see them perform.  All to hear what appear to be witty remarks, bantering comments, and good-natured ribbing.  Just like the jesters of yore, they crack jokes about worldly situations or events of the day, and make wisecracks about well-known individuals like politicians, athletes, and movie-stars familiar to most in the audience.

However, there is a fine line between humor and hurt. Words are a powerful tool God has given us.  They can heal or harm.  We will be justified or condemned for eternity by the words we speak on earth (Matthew 12:37).  Some people – including Christians, make it a very nasty habit of spewing forth spirit-bruising wisecracks about those deemed less fortunate, or who’ve made a mess of life.  If famous, they become society’s laughing-stock to mock and make fun of.

There isn’t any humor in hell, or anything funny about burning there forever.  Salvation is serious business with God, or else He would not have crucified His only Son for us.  It is not to be a laughing matter – ever. Foolish talking has no part in Christian fellowship, nor does it belong in witnessing to lost and unbelieving souls.  Jesting or joking of any kind has no place n a relationship with Jesus.  Sadly, it does, and it always gives place to the devil’s devices (Ephesians 4:27).

Having said all this, loving God with all of our heart, mind, soul, and strength (Luke 10:27) – is not about having a good time in life (1 Corinthians 15:19).  It is not about yukking it up, playing practical jokes and/or pulling pranks, or trying to yank somebody’s chain in a world where Satan retains power over all deaths until Jesus returns (Hebrews 2:14).  Christ is the only example we need to know there is nothing funny in going about our Father’s business daily (Luke 2:49).

Jesus did not go around cracking jokes or poking fun at people like the Pharisees and Sadducees – or even the twelve disciples.  Then saying things such as “Just kidding” – or “I didn’t mean it” to someone like Simon Peter if he looked a bit peeved or put off at something Christ perceived to be funny.  Or, telling another like Andrew he needed to lighten up, go let his hair down and have some fun – for he was being far too serious and over-cautious (1 Peter 5:8, Ephesians 5:14-15).

Christianity can’t be the fodder for comedic sketches and routines … no matter how innocent or harmless they might seem.  The only ones finding any humor in heavenly issues are those making light of salvation (Matthew 22:5).  They have no fear of God before their eyes (Romans 3:18).  Why would they have a reason to be terrified, when they’ve managed to take hell’s keys away from Him; letting themselves into heaven while on earth (Luke 12:5, Revelation 1:18)?

Consequently, they have turned their steadfast focus back to having fun and rollicking good times on earth (Colossians 3:2) – even in church (Ecclesiastes 7:4). Minding earthly matters (Philippians 3:19) , staying entangled in life’s affairs (2 Timothy 2:4), pursuing its pleasures (James 5:5), and attending to far more vital worldly business and merchandise (Matthew 22:5). After all, heaven is in the bag, along with the latest comic CD by some Christian funny man or woman.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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KJV and NKJV Scripture

– You shall not go up and down as a talebearer among the people.  The words of a talebearer are as wounds and go down into the innermost parts of the belly. – Leviticus 19:16 and Proverbs 18:8

– Gossip is the devil’s radio. – George Harrison

“Loose lips sink ships” is a decades-old American idiom that attained wide-spread popularity during WWII.  Originally created by the War Ad Council, it appeared on posters back then put out by the U.S Office of War.  It means beware of unguarded talk, as careless conversations may be of use to any enemy.

Loose lips breed gossipers and busybodies saying words they should not (2 Thessalonians 3:111 Timothy 5:13) – launching seemingly harmless talk such as “Guess what I heard about so-and so?”  We avoid trouble if we keep our mouth (Proverbs 21:23). Gossip means this hasn’t been learned (Psalm 141:3).

Gossip is ungodliness and being disobedient.  It is not having the mind of Christ (1 Corinthians 2:16).  Jesus didn’t go around spreading rumors, revealing personal secrets (John 2:24-25), or engaging in any chit-chat. Gossip is lots of idle talk.  We will all give an account of every idle word we ever say (Matthew 12:36).

So, what exactly is gossip?  It comes to us from the Old English word “godsibb.”  Up until the mid 1500’s, it meant a familiar acquaintance.  As time passed, its sense was extended to one who “engaged in familiar talk.”  However, by the mid 1800’s, gossip had come to mean trifling talk and spreading groundless rumor.

A gossip is sometimes referred to in Scripture as a talebearer or a busybody.  A Christian busybody is not very disciplined – but one who walks disorderly.  It is one who doesn’t work, for they are more focused on the personal affairs of others, in hopes to find some new thing to gossip about (2 Thessalonians 3:11).

Gossip is unsubstantiated hearsay often revealing juicy secrets one has about another (Proverbs 11:13). It has a way of coming back full circle to the person being gossiped about.  It returns loud and clear to their ears.  Even if whispered to begin with, gossip separates close friends in the end (Proverbs 16:28).

Gossip is frequently spread by a person under the guise of them being knowledgeable about something or someone.  This is how gossip gains a foothold and is able to spread.  However, it is not the same as just exchanging information.  The difference between the two centers on intent and why a person is talking.

Information is helpful, gossip is hurtful.  Gossipers have a secret goal to build themselves up by making others look bad, exalting themselves in the process (Luke 14:11).  They speak of the faults, failings, or shortcomings of other people – revealing potentially embarrassing or shameful details about them.

We are all prone to gossip.  It’s why we have to be very careful as Christians as to what we are filling our souls with, for our hearts will always speak out of their abundance (Luke 6:45).  Still, some are more apt to gossip than others depending on how they were brought up – or where they are now in their life.

Those raised in houses full of strife and busy lives hear more in the way of steady talk than those raised in quiet and reserved atmospheres (Proverbs 17:1). People who grow up in the former might become gossipers early on.  Those brought up in the latter usually let their words be few (Ecclesiastes 5:2).

Others gossip out of boredom.  They always need to see or hear some new thing or person to spike their interest and talk (Acts 17:21).  In several studies, boredom was the #1 reason why young people say they spread rumors.  When everyone is happy and getting along, it’s dull.  Gossip can shake things up.

A third group very susceptible to gossip are widowed women and men who can find too much time on their hands.  Once accustomed to children and spouses around the house, they now have empty hours to fill. Without godly thought as how to spend them, idle walking and talking easily begins (1 Timothy 5:13).

Whisperings is another word for gossip.  Christians engaging in either are in eternal danger.  It is a sign of turning aside after Satan and departing the living God (1 Timothy 5:15, Hebrews 3:12).  God can turn one over to whispering when the devil is served and worshipped more than He is (Romans 1:25,28-29).

Gossip generates slanderous communications and comments.  Slander is evil in every way and corrupts any good manners a person may have (1 Corinthians 15:33).  Being a gossip or slanderer requires one to become a busybody – or have another to be one for them – to provide the proper “dirt” on somebody.

A busybody meddles in the affairs of others.  They snoop and spy, being the investigator for the gossips and rumormongers.  Just like some widowers, people like this are not redeeming their time very wisely (Ephesians 5:15-17).  Being a busybody is just as worthy of death as being a murderer (1 Peter 4:15).

Whatever name we want to call gossip, all of them create a lot of contention in life.  However, just as any fire goes out without wood, so does strife cease when the talebearing stops (Proverbs 26:20).  All gossip is sin.  If we regard it in our heart we will have a hard time getting prayers answered (Psalm 66:18).

Loose lips can sink just as many spiritual ships (e.g. fellowship, discipleship, worship) as they do physical ones.  Careless and uncommitted walks with the Lord lead to careless talk and communications.  Unguarded talk such as gossip gives ample ammunition to our adversary, Satan – so he can devour us (1 Peter 5:8).

This is why it is eternally dangerous for Christians to keep on minding earthly matters (Philippians 3:19), and staying entangled in affairs of this life (2 Timothy 2:4).  It means we will keep listening to Satan’s lies more than God’s truths.  Our walk and talk will follow whoever we are heeding and believing more.

Our words will become our earthly and eternal burden (Jeremiah 23:36).  In the end, we will be justified or condemned by all the things we said in this life – or spread like gossip (Matthew 12:37).  Gossip grieves the Holy Spirit (Ephesians 4:30).  It leaves one still stuck on destruction’s broad path (Matthew 7:13).

 

 

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(KJV and NKJV Scripture)

– But the tongue no man can tame … it is an unruly evil, full of poison. – James 3:8

– Therefore, if we seem to be religious, and we cannot bridle our tongues, we deceive our own heart – and our religion is in vain. – James 1:26

Just by putting the smallest of bits in the mouths of big horses, man has been able to get such creatures to obey him.  Mighty ships driven on the oceans by the fiercest of winds, can still be kept on course and controlled with the smallest of helms.  Even so, the talk from our tiny tongues can chart the course of our days.  They can bring forth obedience or disobedience – blessings or curses (James 3:3-5,10).

However, no man can tame them.  They are unruly. We can speak right words or wrong ones.  We can emotionally or spiritually poison another person just by the talk from our tongues.  We can corrupt any good manners we may have established, simply by the words we speak ( 1 Corinthians 15:33).  If we love life and want to see good days – we are to refrain from speaking evil and guile (1 Peter 3:10).

Death and life are in the power of our tongues (Proverbs 18:21).  One slip of them can shipwreck the faith of even the closet brother or sister (1 Timothy 1:19).  Another slip can set off sparks and kindle a fire like hell (James 3:6).  Burning down spiritual buildings, consuming belief, and leaving Christian lives smoldering in the ashes.  We are not like the phoenix.  We cannot always rise from such ruin.

We are to ask God to set a watch before our mouths, and to keep the door of our lips (Psalm 141:3).  We can pray, preach, go to church, do charitable work – and appear to be very religious in the eyes of many others.  However, once a single wrong word escapes our mouth – it is on the lam.  It is not like a fleeing convict trying to make a breakaway – whom we can just go capture again and bring back to prison.

God warns us repeatedly about the power of our words to others … in His Word to us.  A wholesome tongue is a tree of life, but a perverse one can break spirits (Proverbs 15:4).  We can increase the joy or sorrow of another.  We can wound their heart or mar their mind with thoughtless talk.  Just one careless word can reopen an emotional scar from years ago, or aggravate an inner wound from yesterday.

Be warned – we will all give an account of every idle word we speak on earth to God.  By our talk and communications below heaven – will be justified or condemned by our Father above (Matthew 12:36-37). However, only God can teach us to tame our tongues (lead verse).  This comes from being born again of the Spirit (John 3:5) – when Christ comes to dwell in our hearts by faith (Ephesians 3:16-17),

So we are taught the truth with no lie – and learn to put off lying tongues (Jeremiah 9:5, 1 John 2:27).  So we learn to speak and act more and more like Jesus each day (Ephesians 4:20-32).  So we practice the gospel we preach (Romans 2:19-23, 1 Corinthians 9:14).  So we don’t just weigh in on whatever is going on in Christianity – but so our words start having weight – in showing the lost the way to the Cross.

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(KJV and NKJV Scripture)

– Out of the same mouth proceeds blessing and cursing.  My brothers, these things ought not to be. – James 3:10

– Let them curse – but You bless.  When they arise, let them be ashamed, but let Your servant rejoice. – Psalm 109:28

Shimei came tearing out of his house, hurling both curses and stones at David and his men.  One of them named Abishai said, “Why should this dead dog curse my lord, the king?  Let me go over – I pray of you – and take off his head (2 Samuel 16:5-6,9).” However, David knew better than to react so harshly and hastily.  He knew Shimei’s speech and behavior had been bid from above (2 Samuel 16:11).

Perhaps as a test from God, to see if David or his men would curse Shimei back.  Getting into a war of words – or weapons (2 Timothy 2:16).  David was a man after God’s own heart (Acts 13:22).  People back then might have had a hard time believing this if David was getting himself into shouting or shooting matches with everyone who did not like him – or what he was doing.  Shimei certainly didn’t.

Shimei was from the house of Saul, the previous king.  Shimei cursed David, calling him a bloody man of mischief.  It’s why Shimei thought David had lost his kingdom (2 Samuel 16:8).  But – David thought God might requite him some good for not cursing back (2 Samuel 16:12).  So, he and his men just wisely walked away – with Shimei still cursing, throwing stones, and casting dust (2 Samuel 16:13).

Can a fountain send forth – in the same place – sweet water and bitter?  Can a fig tree bear olive berries?  So can no fountain yield both salt water and fresh (James 3:11-12).  Likewise, how convincing can the testimony of any Christian claiming to be following Jesus, sound to any lost or unbelieving person – if blessing and cursing words should be coming forth from the same set of lips?

If we have heard Jesus, and have been taught by God’s truth now dwelling in our hearts by faith (Ephesians 3:16-17) – then we are to put off the conversation of our old man (Ephesians 4:21-22). We are not to be deceived, for evil communications corrupt good manners (1 Corinthians 15:33).  We are not to let such talk come forth from our mouths (Ephesians 4:29).

Oh, but the tongue – no man can tame.  It is an unruly evil, full of deadly poison (James 3:8). Mankind has tamed the biggest of beasts, but our tiny tongues can still kindle a wildfire like hell.  One cursing comment from the mouth of a Christian can do that – damaging any prior testimony (James 3:6-7).  How can we possibly curb cursing words from blurting out – and replace them with blessing ones?

Our every word will be our burden (Jeremiah 23:36). We will be justified or condemned by them (Matthew 12:37).  However, Jesus Christ said that out of the abundance of our hearts, our mouths will speak (Matthew 12:34).  What we fill our hearts with, has to eventually emerge from our lips.  These hearts are like vessels which can only hold so much, before something spills out in speech (Matthew 9:17).

Following or favoring any part of the world has to be partly reflected by our words.  They can appear quite Christian-like for quite a few days – full of seeming kindness, love, and compassion.  Then some care, complaint, want, or worry of the world walks in – and our heart speaks accordingly (Psalm 23:1, Mark 4:19, 1 Peter 5:7).  Making it very hard at times for others to believe anything we’ve said before.

God sets a blessing, and a curse before us each day (Deuteronomy 11:26).  However, back and forth our words can go – between the Word and the world. Blessing people one day, cursing others the next – both from the same mouth (lead verse).  The lost can’t hear without a preacher (Romans 10:14).  If they hear cursing words coming from Christians – why would they want to come closer to the Cross?

We are to let our conversation be as it becomes the gospel of Jesus Christ (Philippians 1:27).  Our communication is about things above – not below (Philippians 3:20).  Always exercising a good conscience, so our talk is void of offense towards God, and towards men (Acts 24:16).  So those who speak evil of us, may be ashamed for falsely accusing our good conversation in Christ (1 Peter 3:16).

Do we think God is not going to send us shouting and cursing people who don’t like us as Christians, similar to how He did by putting Shimei in David’s path?  To see how we respond?  Perhaps people who have been hurt by a church, or a previous cursing word spoken by us.  Those who can’t wait to catch us in our words – maybe hoping for some slander to slip out – like some did with Christ (Mark 12:13).

We can offer them the same hope of salvation as we have (Romans 8:24-25).  Having sanctified God’s truth in our hearts, so we speak such to others with meekness and fear (1 Peter 3:15).  No matter what they are saying or doing in return.  Or, we can keep the lost very cautious and uncertain about the Cross – by speaking hurtful or cursing words, to them or others.  And, nobody gets blessed that way.

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