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KJV and NKJV Scripture

– Let us hold fast the profession of our hope without wavering; for He is faithful as promised. – Hebrews 10:23

– That we should no longer be children, tossed to and fro, and carried about with every wind of doctrine.  By the trickery of man, and cunning craftiness, whereby they lie in wait to deceive. – Ephesians 4:14

The phrase “hold fast” means to remain tightly and firmly secured to something or someone.  With God, it means the ability to stay steadfast and stable in spirit throughout every day, regardless of the situation or circumstance.  It means not letting go of heavenly instructions, for they are our life (Proverbs 4:13).

If you are a true Christian, then you have been born again of the Spirit (John 3:5).  When this happened, you were returned to the Shepherd of your soul (1 Peter 2:25).  An anchor of hope was placed in you with Christ (Hebrews 6:19).  Tightly securing you to Jesus, so you don’t keep wavering in faith and belief.

When physical ships encounter stormy seas, anything not securely fastened to the deck gets tossed around. Essential items to the voyage get badly damaged or destroyed.  Some of these vessels can veer off course in wild weather without seasoned captains and crews, proper ballast, and functional navigational systems.

The same goes for spiritual ships (e.g. discipleship, fellowship, worship, etc.).  However, our spirits are irreplaceable.  If they are not securely tied to Christ inside us at all times, they get tossed around in the storms life can often bring without warning.  Satan is always waiting with open arms during such occasions.

This is why we must keep in memory everything we hear from God.  So we don’t get deceived by the devil or mortal men (Revelation 12:9, Mark 13:5) and led away in err (2 Peter 3:17, James 1:16).  If they steer us to unsalvageable faith shipwrecks, our belief ends up in vain (1 Timothy 1:191 Corinthians 15:2).

Any time we let go of Jesus, we start to list in spirit and begin tilting in belief.  If this continues, we can swerve away from truth (1 Timothy 1:6).  If we look away from Christ for a second, we can start getting frightened by all that is happening in life, and begin sinking in our littleness of faith (Matthew 14:28-31).

Wavering walks with God aren’t the way to steadfastly travel down heaven’s narrow path few will find.  To enter in at the straight gate, and be made partakers of Christ at the end (Matthew 7:14, Hebrews 3:14). This, after enduring everything God commands us to along the way (Hebrews 12:20, Matthew 24:13).

Christians with any selfish and/or worldly focuses to their walk, generally find a solid faith and balanced belief only when self is being served (Matthew 16:24), or lusts are regularly being satisfied (Proverbs 27:20). Otherwise, spiritual wavering enters.  Then, drifting between world and Word starts (1 Corinthians 10:21).

Salvation is a hope and promise no man has seen.  If Christians think they have been saved already (as so many seem to believe), why would they still have to hope for it (Romans 8:24-25)?  Salvation is the end result of our faith – not the beginning of it, or at any other point somewhere along the path (1 Peter 1:9).

Faith is something we contend for, just like the kind delivered to the saints of yore (Jude 1:3).  If we claim hope in Jesus, we hold fast to this profession without wavering (lead verse).  Girding up our loins, being sober, and hoping to the end for God’s saving grace to be brought at Christ’s revelation (1 Peter 1:13).

Faith is a race and a fight that not everybody wins (1 Corinthians 9:24, 1 Timothy 6:12).  Only Christ waits at the finish line and we must keep our eyes fixed on Jesus at all times to win our crown of glory there (1 Corinthians 9:25).  Growing up in grace and running patiently all the way (2 Peter 3:18, Hebrews 12:1-2).

Holding fast to Christ inside us prevents a falling away from repentance, from which it is impossible for God to renew us to (Hebrews 6:4-6).  It makes us able to retain the faithful Word we have been taught.  In turn, it helps us present sound doctrine to exhort and convince the gainsayers (2 Timothy 1:13, Titus 1:9).

This is so we can prove all things and hold fast to all that’s good (1 Thessalonians 5:21).  It is so we don’t backslide by holding firm to the deceit of our heart (Jeremiah 8:5).  One cannot expect victory running every way but straight in any race   Moving steadily ahead in one direction wins, but fast and foolish loses.

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KJV and NKJV Scripture

– That we should no longer be children, tossed to and fro, and carried about with every wind of doctrine.  By the sleight of man, and cunning craftiness, whereby they lie in wait to deceive. – Ephesians 4:14

– Do not be carried about with many and strange doctrines.  For it is good that the heart be established with grace. – Hebrews 13:9

Did you ever stand along the shore and watch a boat on the water sail by?  Was it tilting and listing?  Was it zigzagging or wavering to the left and right?  If the water was a little bit wild or choppy, did it look like the vessel was getting tossed all over the place, and could no longer move straight ahead in the storm?

I would hope not, for it would not be long before something bad happened.  The boat could sink, or veer drastically off course, and dangerously towards ragged rocks along the shore.  If the ship had been built properly, it should keep moving straight ahead no matter what weather or wave conditions existed.

The purpose of building any boat is not just so it can float, but is able to sail from a port of departure to a destination point.  This applies to physical ships and spiritual ones (e.g. fellowship, worship, discipleship). However, all of these boats require a pilot, ballast, a steering mechanism, and a navigational system.

Otherwise, they’ll be adrift, with no way of getting to where they are supposed to.  They will just meander along in whatever direction gentler waves move, or get tossed all over the water when any storms strike. Physical vessels can shipwreck, and so can spiritual ones sailing to salvation’s shore (1 Timothy 1:19).

To prevent such a disaster, one must first be born again (John 3:5).  This is when we are returned to the Shepherd of our souls (1 Peter 2:25).  We are given an anchor of hope in Christ (Hebrews 6:19).  From there, faith and belief must maintain an unwavering, eternal focus (Matthew 6:19-20, Colossians 3:2).

Faith and belief in God and Jesus with any selfish or worldly focus will waver; and sometimes wildly.  This type of attention to truth indicates spiritual infancy, immaturity, ignorance, or any mixture of them.  Faith and belief slowly drift, or fluctuate rapidly depending on whether life is going how you want it to or not.

Spirits soar when it is, and Christians tend to say or think, “I am so blessed” when problems do not exist. Spirits dip when it is not – and Christians tend to say or think, “Why is God messing with me?  I don’t get this” – when problems persist.  This is how confusion God never authors is birthed (1 Corinthians 14:33).

This isn’t the way to walk confidently, patiently, and steadfastly on heaven’s narrow path.  It’s not how to be made partakers of Christ at the end after enduring all God commands to be saved (Hebrews 10:35-36, Hebrews 3:14, Matthew 7:14, Mark 13:13, Hebrews 12:20).  Spiritual shakiness isn’t the way to do this.

All unbalanced walks with God are dangerous (e.g. Proverbs 5:6, lead verse, 2 Peter 3:17, Hebrews 10:23).  Spiritual instability means one has a double mind (James 1:6-8).  Restless or confused thoughts, actions, or behavior exist and persist as one drifts between Word and world (1 Corinthians 10:21).

Christians can’t waver “from “doubt” to “certainty”, then back to “doubt” about anything.  If one part of the mind is sure about something in relation to a walk with God, and the other part isn’t – it gives place to the devil (Ephesians 4:27).  Satan is always waiting to lead unsteady believers away in err (2 Peter 3:17).

God will not tolerate divided attention or focus with Satan at any time.  Christians can’t serve two masters (Luke 16:13).  Loving God and loving worldly things are such polar opposites of each other, it’s impossible to follow both and be steady in spirit (1 John 2:15-16).  Trying to creates a deadly conflict of interest.

Christians attempting any split service between their Saviour and Satan will find firm faith and balanced belief, only when life in the world and Word suits them to a tee.  This is selfishness – a concentration on personal advantage, pleasure, or welfare.  Unless others contribute to this end, they are disregarded.

This is not having Christ’s mind (Philippians 2:3-5). Contrary to a dangerous belief created by truncating Romans 8:1, there is condemnation to Christians who walk after the flesh, because the Spirit cannot lead them at the same time.  The flesh is weak, but when people seek to satisfy its lusts, the Spirit is left out.

Selfish is an anagram of “is flesh.”  A selfish Christian cannot be an unprofitable servant of God (Luke 17:7-10), because they are spending time attempting to get profit they think is deserved from Him.  When this happens, they set a course for worldly wealth and gain again, and swerve from truth (1 Timothy 1:6).

Jesus said “For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also (Luke 12:34).”  If hearts stay set on fleeting things of the world that can’t be taken out (1 Timothy 6:7), it is not the truth, but sin.  This is how wavering walks start, it is why prayers go unanswered (James 4:3), and it’s where problems with God begin.

 

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(NKJV and KJV Scripture)

– That we henceforth be no more children, tossed to and fro – and carried about with every wind of doctrine – by sleight of men and cunning craftiness, whereby they lie in wait to destroy. – Ephesians 4:14

– “I find myself adrift these days, an endless maze of ends and ways – the world seems so crazy to be here.” – “Peaceable Kingdom“, words and music by Rob Carlson, copyright 1974

Every boat on the water has to be following some sort of pre-set course.  Even if it is just going out from shore and back each day – much like a lobsterman might set out to set traps, or see what’s in them – then head back home at dusk.  Whatever the vessel – it requires a steering mechanism to get where it’s going.  A navigational system is also needed to show the captain how to get there.

No matter the size, all ships also have to have ballast.  Even the biggest boats require something for balance – to keep then from getting tossed to and fro during storms.  Without something to stabilize any ship – it will start to list – leaning slightly or significantly to one side or another.  Any wild weather will most likely tip it over – or cause a shipwreck where the boat breaks apart and debris starts floating away.

Pieces of the ship are no longer moored – and they are only steered whichever way the winds and water send them.  This is known as being adrift.  Once this happens – drifting follows, a continuous movement from one place to another – without any definitive direction.  It becomes a steady motion, moving forwards or backwards – side to side – more so when the seas are stormy; less when they subside.

This is known as “to and fro”.  A good example on land would be watching bustling shoppers going “to and fro” from store to store to buy gifts at Christmas. Some go one way – some go another – blending into one big blur of busy-ness.  God warns us to guard against this type of life as believers – as it can sometimes seem – for someone is always lying in wait to trap and destroy us (lead verse).

I seem to see and talk to a lot of dazed Christians – who appear to be adrift these days.  They can be pew passengers sitting inside the seeming comfort of a giant ship – a mega-church sanctuary – but there is no true ballast of belief.  Even in smaller churches – they appear to be listing.  Leaning towards love and worship of the Word – then listing towards lusts and wants of this world … to and fro it goes.

We can’t have a moral and immoral compass on the seas of life at the same time (1 Corinthians 10:21). Our moral compass as Christians is the conviction we have about following Jesus – with steadfast confidence (with faith) we’re being guided towards salvation (Hebrews 3:14).  Remember what happened to Peter when he was walking across the windy water – and took his eyes off Christ (Matthew 14:24-30)?

If we have any type of immoral compass, we’ll remain at least partially trapped in the confusion and corruption of this planet (1 Peter 2:6, 2 Peter 2:20-21).  Our worldly wants (Psalm 23:1) will win out from time to time over the Word.  We’ll go to and fro – back and forth between sound and unsound doctrine.  Sound doctrine is not hearing words which just sound good – as if they will personally benefit and bless us (2 Timothy 4:3-4).

We may not detect distant storms brewing this way. It can be a full-steam ahead attitude because everything seems presently calm in our Christian lives.  So far – it may have seemed to be smooth sailing for the most part.  However, somebody is always lying in wait just below the water’s surface on either side trying to sink us.  His name is Satan – subtly setting traps of lies to trick us into believing something is truth (John 8:44, 2 Corinthians 11:3).

A lot of hurt was waiting on Job’s horizon – and he never saw the storm coming (Job 1:13-19).  Satan did – and God allowed it to hit very hard.  Why?  One reason was Job had become the chief captain of his own ship.  Whether he steered it right or left – it was the right way to go in his own eyes.  God wasn’t Job’s guide anymore – just a guest on his boat.  He was no longer acknowledging and trusting God as his captain and compass.

It might be said Job was sailing smugly in the “I” of his own storm (John 7:18).  Not only was he his own pilot – he was choosing out the course of others as well (Job 29:14-25).  Whether Job was putting them on the path of future peril – did not seem to faze him.  Satan saw this all.  He had been going to and fro in the earth – and walking up and down in it – seeking whom he could devour (Job 1:7, 1 Peter 5:8).

Job was drifting towards destruction (Proverbs 16:2,25).  When devastation hit – nobody could believe it.  His three friends sat silent with him for a week trying to figure it all out (Job 2:11-13).  When all started speaking – everyone drifted to and fro between their respective opinions.  None of them were right per the Lord, to His wrath – and none righted Job’s ship.  God did by humbling him (Job 3:1-42:8).

If anyone feels adrift these days as a believer – it has to be largely in part because of a conscious and daily decision about who is being allowed at all times to be their guide out on the waters of worship and life (Joshua 24:15).  Why would He steer us the wrong way if we look to Him and obey?  God is our only guide all the way to death (Psalm 48:14).  We can’t declare our own paths – and then put God on board our ships of salvation as a mere passenger.

As the lyrics to the lead song allude to, this world is a labyrinth of many lies.  If we keep listening to them while still trying to sail true to the truth of the Word – we can’t help but start listing.  Satan is always lying in wait – on either side of our ships of faith.  Waiting for us to trip and fall overboard – catching us at will in his snares of sin again (1 Timothy 3:7, 2 Timothy 2:26).  Yes, drifting is a very dangerous state to be in as a believer.

It puts us in a constant state of flux – floating between things of the world and Word – whichever has our focus at any given time (Colossians 3:2). Our faith can get tossed to and fro – from being fervent to feigned, and back again – perhaps depending on how our life with the Lord seems to be personally favoring us at the present time.  We have no definitive direction each day.

We can still feel lost as Christians – if a lot of our godly devotion is still being determined by the want of worldly gifts and rewards (Isaiah 1:23).  We’re leaning one day on our own worldly understanding – then leaning back to the Lord when we don’t understand what’s going on (Proverbs 3:5-6).  Back and forth we go until the storm hits.  Then we’re tossed to and fro – and not sure where to go anymore.

If our constant compass as Christians is not Jesus, if we have not turned complete control over to the shepherd and bishop of our souls (1 Peter 2:25, 1 Peter 5:7) – and we don’t have a good conscience about our current course, it probably won’t be long before our faith is finally shipwrecked (1 Timothy 1:19).  Our boats of belief break apart because we had no true ballast to keep them grounded.  We’re set adrift.  Some may already be there.

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