Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for June, 2014


(KJV and NKJV Scripture references at the end)

– For if you forgive men their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you.  But if you do not forgive men their trespasses … neither will your heavenly Father forgive your trespasses. – Matthew 6:14-15

– God picked me up and helped me through, and shined a light on the one thing left to do – and that’s forgive you.  Seven times seventy – if that’s the cost, I’ll pay the price. – “7×70,” written and sung by Chris August, copyright 2010

Unforgiveness may be one of the best ways Satan accuses us – and gains advantage over us time and again throughout our lives.  It is one of the many devices the devil uses in his daily endeavors trying to devour our souls.  Even the most steadfast Christians are not exempt from such attempts.  We cannot allow ourselves to become ignorant of such tactics Satan employs to keep us away from the truth.

We don’t forgive other people for their sake – but for the sake of Jesus.  Just as God is long-suffering and forgiving of our sins against Him – we are to be just as long-suffering and forgiving towards other people for their sins against us.  One of the first things we cannot forget to do when we pray is to forgive others – so God can forgive anything we do against Him.  If we don’t, how can we call Jesus the Lord of our life?

How many times are we supposed to forgive others? After all, people can do so many hurtful or harmful things to us throughout our lives.  Can we ever stop doing it?  Can we ever say, “No, God – I’ve done enough forgiving?”  When Peter asked a similar question to Jesus, Peter thought God’s number of perfection would be sufficient.  However, Christ replied “Not seven times, but seven times seventy.”

That’s 490 times – or seven times a year for 70 years.  This is the average lifespan of man.  Doesn’t this cover forgiveness for an entire life?  As Desmond Tutu said, “Forgiveness frees us from a life of ungodly feelings and actions.  It is essential to spiritual and emotional wellness.”  Redemption in Christ’s blood means we forgive.  If we are not as ready to forgive others as God is us – we are not ready for heaven.

(Scripture references in order of use: Revelation 12:10, 2 Corinthians 2:11, 1 Peter 5:8-9, 2 Corinthians 2:10, 2 Peter 3:9, Mark 11:25, Luke 6:46Matthew 18:21-22, Psalm 90:10, Colossians 1:14)

Read Full Post »


KJV and NKJV Scripture:

– Charge them that are rich in this world, that they not be high-minded, nor trust in uncertain riches … but in the living God, who richly gives us all things to enjoy. – 1 Timothy 6:17

Nowhere in Scripture does God say we can’t be rich in regards to money.  It is a matter of how our hearts and minds view it, use it, and comprehend where it always comes from (Deuteronomy 8:17-18) – that matters to Him.  Abraham, Job, and Solomon would have been considered wealthy by today’s standards. However, they also learned sometimes painful and persistent lessons about the dangers of earthly gain.

God once told Abraham not to regard his stuff – for the good of the land was already his (Genesis 45:20). Job lost nearly everything he had in one day, because his abundance had become his hedge for honoring God (Job 1:10-19).  All of Solomon’s wealth was not enough to satisfy him (Ecclesiastes 2:4-11).  He failed to fully follow after God like his father David had – and suffered the consequences (1 Kings 11:4-25).

Whether we are worldly rich or worldly poor, we are to be content with our wages.  We are not to spend our time trying to exact more than what God has already appointed (Luke 3:13-14).  We are to be content with food and clothing (1 Timothy 6:8).  If we follow the right things, God promises to thoroughly furnish us for all good works, including financially (Philippians 4:19, 1 Timothy 6:11, 2 Timothy 3:17).  

If we are not happy or satisfied with our finances at any time, we will be following after more at least part of the time.  We will spend at least a portion of our brief existence on this earth trying to bolster our bank accounts, improve our portfolios, and/or set money aside for future times such as our retirement. Days in the future we may never see (Proverbs 27:1, James 4:14).  It’s all vanity (Ecclesiastes 5:10).

If we do so, we are still saying we want something from God (Psalm 23:1).  We are not casting all our cares on Him (1 Peter 5:7).  We are not fully trusting He knows all our needs before we do (Matthew 6:8). Any devotion to gathering wealth, any concentration on keeping cash flows constant, or any focus on earthly gain is incompatible with our devotion to God. We cannot serve two masters (Luke 16:13).

Wealth in this world can make us many friends – but our friends cannot save us (Proverbs 19:4).  All of the riches we may have cannot be used as a ransom for someone else’s life.  All of their riches cannot be used as a ransom for ours.  Our souls are precious to God – and they were bought back with the blood of Christ at Calvary – not by how much money we may have in the bank (Psalm 49:6-8, 1 Corinthians 6:20).

Regardless of what we may have – God requires us to be good stewards of it.  However, in His economy, this means we share our blessings with others.  Not preferring them for our own present and personal enjoyment – or stockpiling them for later use by ourselves (e.g. Proverbs 3:27-28, Isaiah 58:7, Luke 3:11, Luke 6:38, Hebrews 13:16, James 4:3, James 5:1-3).  This earth’s profit is for all (Ecclesiastes 5:9).

We can’t receive anything in life except from heaven (John 3:27).  Freely we have been given – freely we are to give (Matthew 10:8),  We are to always offer willingly for this reason (1 Chronicles 29:14).  With cheer; not out of necessity – as if we are only giving to get something back from God (2 Corinthians 9:7). Not so some become overly abundant or burdened, but so there is equality (2 Corinthians 8:12-14).

Even though so many try to figure out precisely what they will need in the way of future finances, worldly riches are always uncertain (lead verse).  The only thing we all can be certain about in this world – is we brought nothing in – and we can carry nothing out of it (1 Timothy 6:7).  With this in mind – what does it profit us if we gain the whole world and lose our souls in the end (Matthew 16:26, Luke 12:16-21)?

 

 

 .

 

Read Full Post »


(KJV and NKJV Scripture)

– Neither let Hezekiah make you trust in the Lord, saying “The Lord will surely deliver us; this city shall not be delivered into the hand of the king of Assyria.” – Isaiah 36:15

– Faith all grown up is trust. – Adam LiVecchi

Trust in life – or in the Lord – cannot be earned and learned by talking about it.  We can’t “make” other people develop trust in us just by the movement of our mouths.  We can’t “make” other people trust in the Lord – by telling them they must – no matter how much may we have learned to do so.  Some may have to go through tough trials before they learn to trust in God as their constant refuge (Psalm 62:8).

However, there are vast differences between putting our trust in people and placing trust in God.  If we attempt to cross the lines of understanding between the two, it can be the catalyst for much confusion.   Distrust with people can develop when someone we thought we were going to trust a long time, does one questionable thing – then another; making us slowly start to doubt their overall reliability.

This makes it hard to fully trust such a person again. The more it happens, the more we learn how to distrust.  The more we learn distrust, the more we learn how to become cynical.  The more cynical we become, the more disbelieving we become.  The more any negativity enters a Christian mind – the more it feeds unbelief – and endangers salvation (Romans 11:20-21, Hebrews 3:12-19, Hebrews 4:6,11).

Cynicism and distrust give birth to mockery.  Mockery can arise from disbelieving anything good is ever going to happen – because one has pretty much lived a life of bad luck and tough breaks.  They may have believed many worldly truths – only to be burnt by as many lies.  It all creates a “Yeah, right – like any good is ever going to happen” mind.  It is not a good one to have with God (Galatians 6:7)

Trust between at least two humans is almost always two-sided and mutual.  It is an “I’ll trust you, if you trust me” outlook.  It is an “I’ll always be there for a person – but they’d better be there for me exactly when I need them” attitude.  It can take years sometimes to develop solid trust – and a single lie told in two seconds to destroy.  However, this trust is often based on our prior desires of being served

If we put initial stock in any program, person, or product – isn’t it because we want them to produce results, perform, or satisfy the way we want ahead of time?  Would we sink money into an investment program, if we had little faith our finances would improve as we might expect them to beforehand?  If we sense anything is going to fail us in advance, why would we proceed any further with trust?

If we were to hire a new baby-sitter, and they showed up late the first night – well, we might give them a second chance.  However, what if they arrived late that second night, and kept us from important dates with people?  What if we found out they did not put the kids to bed on time?  What if they asked for more money than advertised?  Would we say we trusted the baby-sitter or recommend them to others?

Would we keep buying a food product with a bitter taste – hoping it would somehow taste better – but only if we keep pulling out our wallets ?  Would we keep buying and driving a certain make of car always seeming to break down?  These are all examples of how easily we can stop trusting people and things – simply because they’re not serving our wants and desires; especially when money is involved.

Isn’t it easy to say we trust in God when He seems to show up exactly on time, every time – performing dutifully like a rugged old car or truck we have had for years.  Or, nothing about Him leaves a bad or bitter taste in our mouths?  Becoming bitter with God can happen when our Christian lives don’t seem to be getting any better for trusting Him.  It is a dangerous spiritual state to be in (Hebrews 12:15).

So, what is the big difference between human and heavenly trust?   We can say we trust other people – but as soon as they let us down a couple of times – we can often run off to find someone else to trust in. Someone new who will do what we want them to – and when.  God is not our servant – He does not exist to perform and deliver like this (Revelation 4:11). We can still say we trust Him – but for what?

We can say “In God we trust” – but He says “I trust no one but Myself  (Job 4:18).”  It is impossible for is Him to lie (Hebrews 6:18).  If He does or declares anything, it is complete truth (Deuteronomy 32:4). Even if we have the Spirit in us – flesh and Spirit lust against each other – so we can’t do the things we would (Galatians 5:17).  Therefore, we are not to trust ourselves; only Him (2 Corinthians 1:9).

Trusting God means we stop trusting man completely – for our hearts have departed from Him if we do (Jeremiah 17:5).  It means we do not stagger in unbelief because our lives are just not going the way we may have thought – by just trusting in God.  It means we’re fully persuaded He will always perform as promised.  Per His purpose and timing; not ours (Romans 4:20-21, 2 Peter 3:8, Isaiah 46:10).

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: